Meadowlands: A Wetlands Survival Story MOBI å

Meadowlands: A Wetlands Survival Story❰Epub❯ ➟ Meadowlands: A Wetlands Survival Story Author Thomas F. Yezerski – Varanus.us The , acres of wetlands in New Jersey now known as the Meadowlands were once home to hundreds of species of plants and animals But in the four hundred years since European explorers first arrived in t The , acres of wetlands in New Wetlands Survival PDF º Jersey now known as the Meadowlands were once home to hundreds of species of plants and animals But in the four hundred years since European explorers first arrived in the Meadowlands, people have dammed up, drained, built over, and polluted this formerly vibrant ecosystem and all but destroyed it Still, signs of life remain Meadowlands: A PDF/EPUB ² under bridges, on the edges of parking lots, and beside train tracks Slowly but surely, with help from activist groups, government organizations, and ordinary people, the resilient creatures of the Meadowlands are making a comeback, and the wetlands are recovering.

Meadowlands: A Wetlands Survival Story MOBI å
  • Hardcover
  • 40 pages
  • Meadowlands: A Wetlands Survival Story
  • Thomas F. Yezerski
  • English
  • 05 May 2017
  • 0374349134

    10 thoughts on “Meadowlands: A Wetlands Survival Story MOBI å


  1. says:

    A beautiful book that I found in Cleveland Especially wonderful for my NJ peeps The tiny illustrations framing each larger picture are delightful and informative Gratifying to know that this treasure is slowly, slowly renewing itself.


  2. says:

    I loved the tiny drawings in the borders of the birds, trash, insects, fish, etc to be found in the gradually recovering wetlands, and the way Yezerski captures the details of nature against a backdrop of highways, buildings and traffic.


  3. says:

    The author tried to pack too much into a beginning book on wetlands, the environment, the various animals affected by the pollution and cleanup and then suddenly focuses on a little girl named Karrin who learns about the area through a field trip and will go home and tell her family to recycleand use less power to reduce air pollution This is a book that wants to do a wonderful thing show kids specifically why they should conserve and recycle so they can see the connection However, ther The author tried to pack too much into a beginning book on wetlands, the environment, the various animals affected by the pollution and cleanup and then suddenly focuses on a little girl named Karrin who learns about the area through a field trip and will go home and tell her family to recycleand use less power to reduce air pollution This is a book that wants to do a wonderful thing show kids specifically why they should conserve and recycle so they can see the connection However, there is just too much going on in this book Now.watch me eat my words if this wins the Siebert or something next Monday


  4. says:

    Marsh birds are interesting I think it was the artwork that caught my interest in this book It was a well written story of an area in New Jersey called the Meadowlands a come back story.


  5. says:

    8 March 2011 MEADOWLANDS A WETLANDS SURVIVAL STORY by Thomas F Yezerski, Farrar Straus Giroux, March 2011, 40p. ISBN 978 0 375 34913 4 Long may you run, long may you run,Although these changes have come.With your chrome heart shining in the sun,Long may you run Neil Young But even after being dug out, filled in, run over, and dumped on, the wetlands still showed signs of life The Hackensack River still flowed south The tide still rose north from the Atlantic Ocean The river and tide 8 March 2011 MEADOWLANDS A WETLANDS SURVIVAL STORY by Thomas F Yezerski, Farrar Straus Giroux, March 2011, 40p. ISBN 978 0 375 34913 4 Long may you run, long may you run,Although these changes have come.With your chrome heart shining in the sun,Long may you run Neil Young But even after being dug out, filled in, run over, and dumped on, the wetlands still showed signs of life The Hackensack River still flowed south The tide still rose north from the Atlantic Ocean The river and tide still met in the Meadowlands twice a day, as they had for 10,000 years Because they did, the ecosystem had a chance to recover Just studying the detailed watercolor map spanning the full title spread of MEADOWLANDS taught me farabout the Meadowlands in New Jersey than I d ever known as a kid from Long Island Sure, back in the Seventies I d seen the Grateful Dead once at Roosevelt Stadium in adjacent Jersey City And a few years later, I saw Neil Young with The Shocking Pinks at the Brendan Byrne Arena, which is actually built atop what had been part of the 20,000 acres of marshes, swamps, and bogs that originally comprised the estuary where the Hackensack River empties into Newark Bay But I was really ignorant of the area Unfortunately, over the course of American history, this estuary the Meadowlands steadily disintegrated from a place teeming with life to a disgusting wasteland of landfilling and chemical soup Fortunately, thanks to environmental activism and the response of government, that long decline was finally slowed and reversed, beginning in the late Sixties When chemical dumping stopped, the muck could slowly filter pollution out of the water and bury it under layers of new muck Nutrients in the new muck could then feed seeds carried by the river, tide, and wind The seeds grew into grasses and reeds, which also helped filter chemicals from the water Less pollution also meant the swirling freshwater and salt water hadoxygen to add to the little bits of plankton, algae, and detritus The oxygen helped bacteria in the water break down the mix into a nutritious soup for snails, worms, and insects The reeds rattled and ticked, and the wetlands buzzed with millions of bugs In crafting this beautifully illustrated, fact filled, and thought provoking informational picturebook about the destruction of and rebirth of the Meadowlands, Thomas F Yezerski incorporates concepts of geology, geography, biology, history, land use, ecology, and activism In the latter parts of the book, in which we learn about the rebirth of the Meadowlands, Yezerski s stunning ink and watercolor paintings repeatedly depict the overlap of nature and man in this metropolitan area estuary the bugs amidst the river grasses, with a bridge in the foreground occupying half of the two page spread a school of killifish being chased through the water past an empty chips bag by a larger fish, with high tension power lines and industrial buildings in the background a band of fiddler crabs framed around an empty, dented soda can, with high rise apartment buildings in the background a family of ducks in a secluded bit of water with a NJ Transit train going by behind them Yezerski s story, of environmentalism taking root in an urban ecosystem, concludes with a look at a class on a fieldtrip, learning what they can do to help heal the Meadowlands and take care of the Earth in general In the final, memorable two page spread, an osprey in the foreground soars above the teacher and students Across the background, from the vantage point of the osprey, we can scan the skyline of Manhattan rising beyond the skyline of Jersey City A truly notable work Richie Partington, MLISRichie s Picks


  6. says:

    This nonfiction picture book tells the story of the history of the wetlands that are now known as the Meadowlands in New Jersey From hundreds of years ago, when the wetlands had 20,000 acres of marshes through to the 1800s when the land was drained and filled in with dirt to the 20th century when the industries came to surround the Meadowlands with their factories The wetlands were used as a garbage dump, filled with waste and filth It became a problem area in New Jersey until the state decid This nonfiction picture book tells the story of the history of the wetlands that are now known as the Meadowlands in New Jersey From hundreds of years ago, when the wetlands had 20,000 acres of marshes through to the 1800s when the land was drained and filled in with dirt to the 20th century when the industries came to surround the Meadowlands with their factories The wetlands were used as a garbage dump, filled with waste and filth It became a problem area in New Jersey until the state decided that it needed to be cleaned up By 1985 with the clean up and then the developers, there was less than 7000 acres of wetlands left But the wetlands began to recover, with time the lack of pollution and the rivers and tides cleaned the water and allowed plants, birds, fish and animals to return This is a celebration of wetland recovery and the strength of the ecosystem as well as a stirring call to action.Yezerski offers just the right amount of information here for an elementary aged audience From the brief history of when the wetlands were unchanged, readers see how steadily the impact of humans deteriorated the size and quality of them The garbage portion of the story is startling, stark and brief, indicating the small amount of time it took to do such extensive damage When the book turns to the recovery of the Meadowlands, the tone lifts and the text turns to celebrating the nature returning to the area.The pages of the book are bordered with objects pulled from that illustration So the two page spread of the 1800s is bordered with a knife, musket, scythe, trap, kettle, muskrat andThis adds to the feeling of time changing and the area changing along with it The watercolor illustrations are often looking at the wetlands from above, showing the devastation and changes Beautifully, as the wetlands recover, the illustrations becomeclose and intimate with the wetlands and the animals.Get this one on your elementary nature and ecology shelves It is a readable and very successful look at wetland renewal for children Appropriate for ages 7 10


  7. says:

    This inspiring story of how activists, government organizations, and folks like you and me helped heal New Jersey s Meadowlands, which had become a dumping ground for trash and toxic industrial waste, making it an ecological disaster Now the area consists of industry, housing, and businesses co existing with 8,200 acres of wetlands, waterways, and open spaces, a fact which is pretty impressive and offers hope for the Earth s future The turn around began in 1969 when the state put an embargo on This inspiring story of how activists, government organizations, and folks like you and me helped heal New Jersey s Meadowlands, which had become a dumping ground for trash and toxic industrial waste, making it an ecological disaster Now the area consists of industry, housing, and businesses co existing with 8,200 acres of wetlands, waterways, and open spaces, a fact which is pretty impressive and offers hope for the Earth s future The turn around began in 1969 when the state put an embargo on dumping After this human help, the ecosystem began to heal The story and pen and ink watercolors portray the domino effect that occurs as pollution is filtered from the water and soil, encouraging insects, birds, and fish to return to the area My appreciation of the book was marred when the author shifts into a couple of pages that discuss how a child on a field trip to the area can teach her family how to be less wasteful Ending with the triumph of an osprey being born in a nest in the Meadowlands for the first time in several decades is the perfect note on which to add, but I d have left out the field trip vignette It didn t seem to fit well and distracted from the story s flow While I liked the beautiful thumbnail illustrations all across the book s border, some of birds, plants, and buildings, the author might have included an explanation of each of them as part of the backmatter I m assuming that all of them have significance to the environmental story being told here, but it would be nice to have that fact confirmed


  8. says:

    Meadowlands heyday to decline to destruction to its current rebirthAs someone who previously only knew the Meadowlands as the place the Jets Giants play, probably a good thing I read this one Turns out it s also the estuary fancy word, book where the Hackensack empties into Newark Bay and where Atlantic tides come in Oh yes, a fresh saltwater mix.Pretty good trip Yezerski does a good job laying out the progressively horrible effects people had on the ecosystem From living with the eco Meadowlands heyday to decline to destruction to its current rebirthAs someone who previously only knew the Meadowlands as the place the Jets Giants play, probably a good thing I read this one Turns out it s also the estuary fancy word, book where the Hackensack empties into Newark Bay and where Atlantic tides come in Oh yes, a fresh saltwater mix.Pretty good trip Yezerski does a good job laying out the progressively horrible effects people had on the ecosystem From living with the ecosystem to profitting off of it to flat out poisoning, you can see why nature packed up and got out of Jersey Wind smelled like paint says it all.Luckily nature kicks ass Once we stopped dumping chemicals, nature rebuilt using plankton and algae from the tide and dirt and dead plants from the rivers Now ever fickle animals are returning Woot Each page has a large picture and a block of text surrounded by a border of small pictures related to what you d find in the Meadowlands at that step of it s journey Good deal.I want you to know Ruddy ducks build floating nests that rises and falls with the tides.Also, this This is the chance for the fiddler crabs to dance Each male fiddler has one big clumsy claw he waves back and forth, back and forth He taps his pointy feet so quietly, only a female fiddler crab can hear him If she likes his performance, she will follow him home to his burrow in the mud The waterline flickers with rows of hundreds of yellow claws


  9. says:

    I m a lifelong resident of New Jersey who avoids that part of the state as if my life depended on it Growing up not far from the hustle and bustle of the Meadowlands, I longed for the day when I would move to an area that is less congested andabundant in nature It is very difficult to imagine the place as a beautiful, nature filled wetland.Fact filled overview of the history, development and natural habitat that is the Meadowlands The author discusses the human development, but also spe I m a lifelong resident of New Jersey who avoids that part of the state as if my life depended on it Growing up not far from the hustle and bustle of the Meadowlands, I longed for the day when I would move to an area that is less congested andabundant in nature It is very difficult to imagine the place as a beautiful, nature filled wetland.Fact filled overview of the history, development and natural habitat that is the Meadowlands The author discusses the human development, but also spends a great deal of time highlighting the animals and natural progress as well Discusses conservation in a factual way, emphasizing the visible benefits of changed behaviors and practices.Large illustrations on each page show the many views of the area Small captioned images frame the page adding depth to the page s content These are wonderful for a one on one storytime where the readers can dawdle on each page, discussing what they mean They could also help make this book a useful starting point for New Jersey research projects For expample a page shows an illustration of a chocolate drink that looks very much like Yoo Hoo, which turns out was a NJ based business Seemingly random pictures hint at a greater story.Appendix includes author s note, selected bibliography print and web


  10. says:

    I really appreciated the matter of fact tone of the text There were no heavy handed moralizing over the pollution and overdevelopment, and no sanctified epiphanies about saving the earth It actually felthopeful that way We made the stupid decisions, but we can make the smart decisions, too I liked that all of the pictures had some indications of urban development in them trains, electric wires, bridges, buildings even after the conservation efforts started to show effects This is an I really appreciated the matter of fact tone of the text There were no heavy handed moralizing over the pollution and overdevelopment, and no sanctified epiphanies about saving the earth It actually felthopeful that way We made the stupid decisions, but we can make the smart decisions, too I liked that all of the pictures had some indications of urban development in them trains, electric wires, bridges, buildings even after the conservation efforts started to show effects This is an urban enclave, after all, not an untouched wilderness I liked that the author took pains to describe what a slow process recovery is You don t just pick up the litter, you then have to wait for the tide and the microorganisms to clear the way for larger plants which then sustain small animal life, which then sustains larger animal lifeBeautiful watercolors, with great detail illustrations on the borders of each page

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