Song of Wrath: The Peloponnesian War Begins ePUB ¹

Song of Wrath: The Peloponnesian War Begins[Reading] ➬ Song of Wrath: The Peloponnesian War Begins ➳ J.E. Lendon – Varanus.us Song of Wrath tells the story of Classical Athens victorious Years War against grim Sparta the st decade of the terrible Peloponnesian War that turned the Golden Age of Greece to lead Historian JE Song of Wrath tells Wrath: The PDF/EPUB » the story of Classical Athens victoriousYears War against grim Sparta the st decade of the terrible Peloponnesian War that turned the Golden Age of Greece to lead Historian JE Lendon presents a sweeping tale of pitched Song of ePUB ¹ battles by land sea, sieges, sacks, raids, deeds of cruelty guile along with courageous acts of mercy, surprising charity, austere restraint arrogant resistance Recounting the rise of democratic Athens to great power status, the resulting fury of authoritarian Sparta, Greece s of Wrath: The Kindle Ï traditional leader, Lendon portrays the causes strategy of the war as a duel over national honor, a series of acts of revenge A story of new pride challenging old, Song of Wrath is the st work of Ancient Greek history for the post cold war generation.

Song of Wrath: The Peloponnesian War Begins ePUB ¹
    Song of Wrath: The Peloponnesian War Begins ePUB ¹ the post cold war generation."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 576 pages
  • Song of Wrath: The Peloponnesian War Begins
  • J.E. Lendon
  • English
  • 05 July 2018
  • 0465015069

    10 thoughts on “Song of Wrath: The Peloponnesian War Begins ePUB ¹

    Song of Wrath: The Peloponnesian War Begins ePUB ¹ the post cold war generation."/>
  1. says:

    Hybris is the Greek word A claim to rank and to worth thought not deserved or not yet earned The concept as it concerned the Greeks went back at least as far as Achilles and Agamemnon in the opening lines of Iliad By the time of the mid 400s BC its influence on rank had become the most important determinate of power among the Greek city states As J E Lendon informs us in Song of Wrath The Peloponnesian War Begins, it was the primary cause of the war The Peloponnesian War between Sparta a Hybris is the Greek word A claim to rank and to worth thought not deserved or not yet earned The concept as it concerned the Greeks went back at least as far as Achilles and Agamemnon in the opening lines of Iliad By the time of the mid 400s BC its influence on rank had become the most important determinate of power among the Greek city states As J E Lendon informs us in Song of Wrath The Peloponnesian War Begins, it was the primary cause of the war The Peloponnesian War between Sparta and Athens and their allies lasted 27 years, 431 404 BC Our primary source though not the sole source of the events of the causes and events of the war has always been The Peloponnesian War, the history by the great Athenian historian and general, Thucycides From his history have evolved our notions of that conflict reflecting in many ways the conflicts of our time Some of the political thinking of today and then can be mirrored Though he limits himself to writing about the first ten years of the war, ended by the tentative but well intentioned Peace of Nicias in 421 BC, Lendon s convincing analysis is that what was different between the modern age and the ancient, what s strange to us, and what caused the war and determined how it was fought wasn t a desire for conquest, political gain, and wealth, but instead perceptions of rank, pride, and honor, and questions of hegemony For most of the century Sparta had been the predominant power of the Greek world In 431 BC, probably as it had always been, divisions of power among the many city states was well established and universally recognized, though most likely not officially designated It was an informal understanding Challenges to the order were justification for armed conflict of some kind, the conduct of which wasn t the total war of our time in which we try to severely damage our enemies and limit their ability ro fight us Greek warfare was largely demonstrations and raids, posturing and challenge Defeat was often determined by one side or the other refusing to take the field And wartime operations were carefully orchestrated to avoid escalation Tit for tat A Spartan invasion of the region around Athens to destroy crops was answered by Athenian raids along the Pelopennesian coast, but nothingthat would alter the strategic situation So it was that in mid century when Athens began to be a force in the region, primarily as a naval power, and acted belligerently in response to Spartan strongarm treatment of states near Athens, it was seen as a challenge to Sparta s hegemony and a bid for equal ranking hybris and an intolerable state of affairs for Sparta.Lendon writes that Thucydides understood his world and conflict in these terms However, he didn t detail the impulses for war and peace in his great history His audience, after all, was Greek, and they understood the importance of rank, pride, and hegemony without having it spelled out The blurring has occurred in our own interpretation of Thucydides s history because we see war and diplomacy in terms of political gain, wealth, or conquest So this is a fascinating work and one which forms a fresh perspective on one of the most important conflicts of the ancient world Because it took place during Greek s Golden Age, it ripples culturally all these long years down to us.Other than the fascinating analysis and interpretation, which is what good history is, another attraction of Lendon s book is how well it s written The language is almost Homeric, and it approaches the lyrical I ve seldom come across history written this well If you enjoy reading good history written engagingly, and if you re interested in ancient Greece and the Peloponnesian War, this is a book for you


  2. says:

    The Greeks present an unequalled temptation to cheap ventriloquism, so tantalizing the apparent similarities between their world and ours How easy to slither into the back of a Demosthenes or Epitadas and wave his long dead hand to our modern tune The ancients then wheeze and stammer our own thoughts back at us, and we nod and guffaw in turn In stark contrast, the historian s art is to amplify the tenuous voice of antiquity without distorting it, so that ancient voices make themselves heard a The Greeks present an unequalled temptation to cheap ventriloquism, so tantalizing the apparent similarities between their world and ours How easy to slither into the back of a Demosthenes or Epitadas and wave his long dead hand to our modern tune The ancients then wheeze and stammer our own thoughts back at us, and we nod and guffaw in turn In stark contrast, the historian s art is to amplify the tenuous voice of antiquity without distorting it, so that ancient voices make themselves heard above the modern din Song of Wrath demonstrates that J.E Lendon is a historian of rare and exceptional craft.Set against the canvas of the Peloponnesian War, Song of Wrath examines the Greeks as men motivated by competitive honor Much as Herodotus sought the font of the Persian wars, Lendon aims to unravel the Gordian knot of the causes of Peloponnesian war Acknowledging the tapestry of Greek motivation, Lendon plucks out a seemingly curious strand a cycle of hubris, wrath, and revenge quite alien to the modern mind that goaded Greek men to war That this was as true of cities as their citizens is equally foreign to our sensibility Lendon convincingly argues that this cyclical corporate passion undergirds the war between Athens and Sparta In particular, he narrates the carefully reciprocal series of pillage, raids, battles, and negotiations, through which Athens and Sparta sought to establish hegemony in the eyes of their fellow Greeks The cruel calculus that ranked the Greeks makes sense of a plethora of odd details of the war why did culpable Boetia escape the depradations of Athens so long why did the Athenians ignore Platea in their demands after their victory at Navarino If its argument makes Song of Wrath an important book, the lan with which Lendon delivers it makes Song of Wrath a delightful book Its opening passage evoking an night time Athenian assault on Megara, its paean to the eels of Copa s, and its account of quirky, fatal augury of the Thracians deftly season the meat of the argument His writing marries the calm study of the historian, in the company of his friendly circle of abstract nouns, as Lendon describes Thucydides, with an eye for image and and ear for cadence that suit the epic scope of the war as well as Homer could ask.Near the end of his lament in The Cambridge Companion to the Roman Historians, Lendon imagines Tacitus, a Roman wielding a Roman pen in a Roman room, poring over and comparing the works of his Roman predecessors, here re writing, here combining, here adding something that he has found out, here thrilling when he can finish a story he got from a predecessor with one of the brilliant sententiae his Roman audience loved J E Lendon, Historians without History Against Roman Historiography Reading Song of Wrath, we must understand that Lendon s description of Tacitus applies curiously well to Lendon himself Born out of time, he is a Greek, writing with a Greek pen, here combining, there analyzing, and all throughout delighting in his eels


  3. says:

    this is a really impressive work with a interesting theory of a order of city states based on tim but the repetitiveness of explaining every battle in this way made me loose interest and put the book away for some time before reading it again.


  4. says:

    Lendon has a hobby horse and he rides it pretty hard Now, don t get me wrong, he has an interesting thesis interesting especially because it is based on his understanding of the cultures involved He should have just let the story speak for itself after laying out his argument at the beginning It is a shame that the book becomes so repetitious Now, perhaps the repetitiousness is due to his theory being controversial i.e defensiveness about it against critics I don t know the field enoug Lendon has a hobby horse and he rides it pretty hard Now, don t get me wrong, he has an interesting thesis interesting especially because it is based on his understanding of the cultures involved He should have just let the story speak for itself after laying out his argument at the beginning It is a shame that the book becomes so repetitious Now, perhaps the repetitiousness is due to his theory being controversial i.e defensiveness about it against critics I don t know the field enough to say Now, his basic thesis is that all the events and decisions of the war were based on the protagonists efforts to reach either equality or superiority of rank Here s a long quote that summarizes this Despite changes in leadership Athens strategy in the Ten Years War was remarkably consistent, at least in its objective she sought a higher rank than Sparta had been willing to acknowledge before the war To be sure, that objective was sought by different methods, and to different degrees, at different stages under Pericles, the Athenians sought to prove their equality in rank with Sparta by reciprocal and proportionate revenge From late 427 BC until their isolation of the Spartans on Sphacteria, they sought the same goal but abandoned the limitations of reciprocity and proportion Once they had isolated the Spartans on Sphacteria, and evenso after they had captured the men on the island, the Athenians elevated their ambitions They began to seek superiority in rank over the Spartans rather than mere equality, and to this end they switched to a policy of coercion, rather than merely shaming, to force Sparta to acknowledge Athenian superiority.Athens coercion of Sparta, taking the form of the raids from Pylos and Cythera, was just that coercion It was still not intended to destroy Sparta but rather to make Sparta admit that Athens had won the war over rank But suspecting that Sparta herself might never yield superiority, Athens attempted to appeal to the wider Greek world in late 425 and 424 BC by embarking upon a concerted policy of emulating her glorious deeds and accomplishments in the 450s and early 440s BC When that strategy failed at Delium in late 424 BC, Athens returned to seeking equality with Sparta, a goal she achieved in the Peace of Nicias and accompanying alliance of 421 BC 376 7


  5. says:

    J E Lendon s history of the Peloponnesian War differs from the usual treatments in two ways First, instead of tackling the entire 27 year period, he after pointing out that the Peloponnesian War is really four different wars traditionally grouped together only covers the first ten years, from the outbreak of hostilities to the treaty between Athens and Sparta in 421 BC he calls this the Ten Years War, whereas others call it the Archidamian War And second, he challenges the traditional J E Lendon s history of the Peloponnesian War differs from the usual treatments in two ways First, instead of tackling the entire 27 year period, he after pointing out that the Peloponnesian War is really four different wars traditionally grouped together only covers the first ten years, from the outbreak of hostilities to the treaty between Athens and Sparta in 421 BC he calls this the Ten Years War, whereas others call it the Archidamian War And second, he challenges the traditional view of what the war was fought over first put forward by Thucydides in favor of one based on a study of Ancient Greek culture.He starts with an overview of honor glory worth, or tim , which is how ancient Greeks ranked and competed among themselves, and by extension how the intensely competitive city states measured themselves against each other To have tim was to be of importance, to have importance, to have other cities look to you to be the hegemon Status for cities was a mix of current strength and past glories, and Sparta stood tall in both in the fifth century BC, allowing it to lead an alliance to be the hegemon of many of the Greek states against the Persians.Athens past was not considered nearly so glorious, but in the aftermath of the Persian Wars she became the head hegemon of the Delian League a collection of overseas territories in the Aegean that banded together for protection against Persia Athens slowly converted this mutual defense league intoof an empire, taking money tribute instead of the loan of naval forces, and establishing a firmer say in the internal affairs of its members Thucydides and most everyone follows his lead claims that the Pelopennesian War started because of Sparta s fear of Athens growing power.Lendon points out that this was a controversial argument at the time, which is why Thucydides spends so much time elaborating and defending it He believes that the war actually stemmed from an argumentreadily understood by the Ancient Greeks, butobscure to us Athens now considered itself to be Sparta s equal in tim , and wanted Sparta to admit it without which, convincing anyone else would be difficult.The bulk of the rest of the book is Lendon playing connect the dots with what we know of the events of the Ten Years War, and interpreting them in terms of tim He constantly refers back to this theme, as if afraid it might go somewhere without him But since it is, at best, a very nebulous concept, this is essential, though it might have been better handled.The major weakness of the thesis and book is that since tim is all in the minds of the people involved, it is very hard to prove that it really had the bearing on events he says it does Even worse is the fact that it isof a groupthink a collection of what the entire Greek world thought of the relative standings of Sparta and Athens But, towards the end, he finally brings forth his answer to that problem If Athens who is the city with something to prove can get Sparta to act like Athens is proving its point, then the rest of the Greek world will tend to follow the line of the two principles.Despite the fact that the book is inevitably nebulous in some particulars, it really is a convincing reconstruction of events based on what we know of the culture, and I highly recommend it


  6. says:

    This is a very well written, albeit tendentious, review of the first half 431 421 of what we call The Peloponnesian War , a struggle between Athens, and its allies and subjects, against Sparta, and its allies and subjectx, which ended with a final Athenian defeat approximately seventeen years later Of course it s much, muchcomplicated than that, subsidiary conflicts being all over the place and such truces and alliances even one between Athens and Sparta following 421 as there were b This is a very well written, albeit tendentious, review of the first half 431 421 of what we call The Peloponnesian War , a struggle between Athens, and its allies and subjects, against Sparta, and its allies and subjectx, which ended with a final Athenian defeat approximately seventeen years later Of course it s much, muchcomplicated than that, subsidiary conflicts being all over the place and such truces and alliances even one between Athens and Sparta following 421 as there were being punctuated by feints, subversion and occasional outright fighting.The tendetiousness of Lendon s account is in his claim that Greek war was about honor and status first and foremost As he has it, Sparta was vying with Argos for first place, even after the Persian war Athens, however, wanted its place in the sun and was willing to fight for it for at least equal status with Sparta that is That, in Lendon s view, is what the first Peloponnesian War was virtually all about and what it in fact accomplished.Other than the excellent writing, what I liked about this book was its partial fulfilment of the author s promise to try to get at what won t find in Thucydides, namely those things attitudes, assumptions, facts which would have been too obvious to mention to his Greek readership The business about honor and status is a case in point I also liked the liberal use of maps throughout the text, maps which are reproduced, sometimes multiple times, when they are relevant to the narrative it s not easy to keep track of all those myriad tiny poleis without such aids


  7. says:

    Song of Wrath The Peloponnesian War BeginsJ.E LendonRead it in Hardcover at 566 pages including maps, chronology 480BC 421BC , Glossaries, notes, extensive bibliography, etc.The Peloponnesian War is fascinating and the city states are diverse interesting actors that can t help fall prey to their own histories, mythology, and need to defend a sense of honor Victims of an intense mythological rivalry that would propel and dictate behavior in a long lasting war that consequentially destabilizes Song of Wrath The Peloponnesian War BeginsJ.E LendonRead it in Hardcover at 566 pages including maps, chronology 480BC 421BC , Glossaries, notes, extensive bibliography, etc.The Peloponnesian War is fascinating and the city states are diverse interesting actors that can t help fall prey to their own histories, mythology, and need to defend a sense of honor Victims of an intense mythological rivalry that would propel and dictate behavior in a long lasting war that consequentially destabilizes and punishes the entire region This rivalry, Hybris, is the lens in which Lendon is analyzing the history and motivations and thus Song of Wrath is not strictly a history of the war Lendon excels at this and he s at his best when trying to comprehend the actions of the actors.The book itself is split into nine chapters and the epilogue Lendon sets the stage in the first two chapters before delving into the war itself Chapters are around forty pages Great maps, extensive bibliography and notes My biggest issue is that Lendon doesn t cover the entirety of the war, he stops mid stroke He does give a few paragraphs in the epilogue but as a reader only covering the ten years outbreaks from 431 421 left me feeling a little disgruntled If you are interested in reading this I would suggest you already have a general idea of the Peloponnesian War Mainly because the point of this is the examination of Hybris in the context of the war I m very interested in his other work, Soldiers and Ghosts A History of Battle in Classical Antiquity


  8. says:

    Lendon wrote this book for people who know nothing about the Peloponnesian War as well as those who can quote Thucydides at will I m definitely in the former camp I knew of a Peloponnesian War, that it involved the Greeks, and I had some vague idea that the Spartans won eventually Apart from that, nothing The book jacket will give you a summary of Lendon s thesis Suffice it to say, I found it convincing he really does drive his argument home, and the perhaps necessary repetition and over Lendon wrote this book for people who know nothing about the Peloponnesian War as well as those who can quote Thucydides at will I m definitely in the former camp I knew of a Peloponnesian War, that it involved the Greeks, and I had some vague idea that the Spartans won eventually Apart from that, nothing The book jacket will give you a summary of Lendon s thesis Suffice it to say, I found it convincing he really does drive his argument home, and the perhaps necessary repetition and over explanation of that argument is this book s only significant weakness But in the scope of what Lendon has accomplished, that weakness turns out to be minor The guy can write, first of all, which makes this excursion through what could easily have been a bewildering maze of Greek names and muddled motives an actually fun ride He describes battles and almost battles with zest and humor, and prods forth characters like the wily king Perdiccas of Macedonia, the heroic, tragic Brasidas of Sparta, and the monstrous Cleon of Athens And it s not all candy, either Lendon s arguments are intellectually robust and his narrative culturally sensitive We may tend to take for granted that the ancient Greeks were essentially like us Lendon shows us how different they could be When, finally, he suggests, very subtly, that there may be lessons for our own time to be found in the opening decade of an exhausting war, he turns that sense of difference inside out


  9. says:

    Lacks the narrative drive and telling details of popular history, while not as dry and ponderous as academic history Is it popular academic Lendon does demonstrate the unflagging commitment to a thesis that marks academic history in this case, the leading role that a kind of sports league ranking played in governing the outlook and behaviour of classical Greece Actions and inactions that seem puzzling to a modern mind accustomed to materialism and real politic become clear under the logic Lacks the narrative drive and telling details of popular history, while not as dry and ponderous as academic history Is it popular academic Lendon does demonstrate the unflagging commitment to a thesis that marks academic history in this case, the leading role that a kind of sports league ranking played in governing the outlook and behaviour of classical Greece Actions and inactions that seem puzzling to a modern mind accustomed to materialism and real politic become clear under the logic of status At times, Lendon gilds the lily, overstating his case to explain too many decisions taken by Athens or Sparta But he clearly delights in the subject matter, and the story cracks along, never bogging down in pedantry Not recommended as an introduction to the Peloponnesian War, but a though provoking and iconoclastic take on the conflict for enthusiasts on the subject


  10. says:

    J E Lendon, professor of history at UVA, walks the well tread ground of ancient Greek history in this recounting of the first ten years of the Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta This period was perhaps most notably covered in the past half century by Donald Kagan of Cornell For the remaining seventeen years of the conflicts, concluding with Athens surrender, we can only hope that Lendon continues the saga Until then we have Kagan, who while somewhatprosaic, is nevertheless a wo J E Lendon, professor of history at UVA, walks the well tread ground of ancient Greek history in this recounting of the first ten years of the Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta This period was perhaps most notably covered in the past half century by Donald Kagan of Cornell For the remaining seventeen years of the conflicts, concluding with Athens surrender, we can only hope that Lendon continues the saga Until then we have Kagan, who while somewhatprosaic, is nevertheless a worthy guide.This is by no means another dry rework as have been others of recent recall It is a labor of love, which often waxes poetic in the telling of Thucydides history Consider To her neighbors, the Boetians, Copais gave their comfortable things herbs and rushes, plump ducks and woodcocks, and above all tasty eels grown fat from nibbling beneath the green brown waters upon the inundated works of forgotten men From the opening passages describing a nighttime betrayal and attack on Sparta by Athenian avengers, the ten year tit for tat war of ravage and revenge is drawn in devastating detail Lendon describes sacrifices bled in the surf during the Eleusinian Mysteries, the wailing of newly made widows, and the dramatic last minute reprieve at the siege of Mytilene, all with equal commitment.Perhaps,importantly, there is the psychological underpinning of the events based on honor and revenge, told with a lucidity that lays bare the stunning tragedy and madness of war The theme may be iterated a few times too many, but this is a trifling quibble The book is worth reading again it is rare for a story to be so well retold

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