Two Girls, Fat and Thin ePUB Ç Two Girls, PDF \ Fat

Two Girls, Fat and Thin☉ Two Girls, Fat and Thin PDF / Epub ❤ Author Mary Gaitskill – Varanus.us Justine, a beautiful, lonely, sexually addicted young woman, meets Dorothy, fat, maladjusted, and unhappy since childhood They are superficially a study in contrasts yet share equally haunting sexual Justine, a beautiful, lonely, sexually addicted young Fat and MOBI õ woman, meets Dorothy, fat, maladjusted, and unhappy since childhood They are superficially a Two Girls, PDF \ study in contrasts yet share equally haunting sexual burdens carried since youth With common secrets, they are drawn into a remarkable Girls, Fat and PDF È friendship.

Two Girls, Fat and Thin ePUB Ç Two Girls,  PDF \ Fat
  • Hardcover
  • 320 pages
  • Two Girls, Fat and Thin
  • Mary Gaitskill
  • English
  • 12 November 2019
  • 0671685406

    10 thoughts on “Two Girls, Fat and Thin ePUB Ç Two Girls, PDF \ Fat


  1. says:

    I love Mary Gaitskill This is her first novel This book is structurally flawed, but I think the flaw is due to her focus and the material and probably unavoidable Her second novel, Veronica, is a diamond The prose is flawless Her observations are incisive, honest, vicious, hilarious, and penetrating And oddly comforting I have read this book at least four or five times and don t doubt that I ll read it again.I dock a star not so much for the aforementioned structural problems but becaus I love Mary Gaitskill This is her first novel This book is structurally flawed, but I think the flaw is due to her focus and the material and probably unavoidable Her second novel, Veronica, is a diamond The prose is flawless Her observations are incisive, honest, vicious, hilarious, and penetrating And oddly comforting I have read this book at least four or five times and don t doubt that I ll read it again.I dock a star not so much for the aforementioned structural problems but because the story contains an extremely over caricatured Ayn Rand The novel would have been stronger had she rendered Rand withsubtlety Rand s biography is bizarre, contradictory and fantastical, but here she is littlethan a cartoon character She is a cardboard stage prop for thefully rendered characters to bat about I think Gaitskill missed an opportunity to do somethingcomplex with Rand in her fiction But I imagine it could be argued that Justine s magazine article is a kind of meta reference to Gaitskill s own treatment of Rand Or that Gaitskill s rendition is reflective of the way Rand glossed over the edges of her rather 2D characters in her books So who knows


  2. says:

    Mary Gaitskill s first novel centres on the meeting and subsequent unconventional friendship between two girls women, but I ll let that pass because a large chunk of the book is about their experiences of growing up Dorothy Never fat and Justine Shade thin Justine is a part time journalist who places an ad looking for devotees of the novelist Anna Granite and her philosophy of Definitism very thinly veiled stand ins for Ayn Rand and Objectivism Dorothy, who was not only an acol Mary Gaitskill s first novel centres on the meeting and subsequent unconventional friendship between two girls women, but I ll let that pass because a large chunk of the book is about their experiences of growing up Dorothy Never fat and Justine Shade thin Justine is a part time journalist who places an ad looking for devotees of the novelist Anna Granite and her philosophy of Definitism very thinly veiled stand ins for Ayn Rand and Objectivism Dorothy, who was not only an acolyte of Granite but also worked for her, replies The women have superficial differences I presume these are the reason for the title, as Dorothy s fatness and Justine s thinness are not really relevant to the plot but both sense much deeper things in common, establishing a sort of psychic bond that leads them to confide in each other about their shared experience of childhood sexual abuse Gaitskill then rewinds and tells, in alternate chapters, the story of each character s awful coming of age before returning to the present, where we see how these events have broken our by now muchsympathetic antiheroines Dorothy idolises the memory of her only lover, a married man, and exists in a state of isolation, splendid or tragic depending on how you see it Justine repeats a pattern of degrading sexual encounters and becomes involved in an exploitative sadomasochistic relationship with a strangely impish man she meets in a bar These seemingly disparate paths conspire to pull Dorothy and Justine together again, culminating in a symbolic climax that consolidates the odd connection between the two.As a whole this is not perfect there s something slightly too zany about it, an offputting quality I find in a lot of 90s fiction Yet there are parts of it I ll be thinking about for a long while some pages so startling in the singularity of their insights that I felt physically jolted and Dorothy is one of the best fictional characters I ve come across in recent times Also, this book didthan anything else to make me want to read Rand, which was probably not Gaitskill s intention but is an interesting side effect the experiences Dorothy has as a result of her encounters with Granite s work are just too powerful to be undermined by the scenario s satirical nature.TinyLetter Twitter Instagram Tumblr


  3. says:

    Mary Gaitskill is one of my favorite authors Her stories and novels are frightening, dark, and revealing Her characters are often cruel, scared, ugly, and in pain But they also seem familiar somehow, and sympathetic even when they should be unlikeable Gaitskill s girls in this novel are developed through vignettes about their childhoods interspersed with present interactions between themselves and with others I love this book especially for its satire of Ayn Rand Anna Granite and Object Mary Gaitskill is one of my favorite authors Her stories and novels are frightening, dark, and revealing Her characters are often cruel, scared, ugly, and in pain But they also seem familiar somehow, and sympathetic even when they should be unlikeable Gaitskill s girls in this novel are developed through vignettes about their childhoods interspersed with present interactions between themselves and with others I love this book especially for its satire of Ayn Rand Anna Granite and Objectivism Definitism Justine, a Manhattan journalist, and Dorothy, a former follower of Definitism, meet when Justine begins working on a research article on the movement Like other Gaitskill characters, the tenuous relationship between Justine and Dorothy, both of whom seem to clearly self identify as straight, has queer overtones One review states that this book shows, once again, how family fucks you up Beyond that, I think this book is about how adults from fucked up families or not can become so isolated and the ways that they try to compensate for scarce emotional connections


  4. says:

    I had some fixed ideas about what this book would be about when I started it I thought it would be about Ayn Rand, and I thought it would be about sexual abuse And I guess it sort of is, but I think that these descriptions do not do it justice.In fact, what it seems to me the novel is really about is cruelty Cruelty and weakness Cruelty and weakness as they are somehow inscribed into the very fabric of society, of school, of families, of sex, of children Of course, Ayn Rand is about that to I had some fixed ideas about what this book would be about when I started it I thought it would be about Ayn Rand, and I thought it would be about sexual abuse And I guess it sort of is, but I think that these descriptions do not do it justice.In fact, what it seems to me the novel is really about is cruelty Cruelty and weakness Cruelty and weakness as they are somehow inscribed into the very fabric of society, of school, of families, of sex, of children Of course, Ayn Rand is about that too, but I don t know that the point of this book is so much to satirize her, as it is to explain why people would come to be fascinated with her, even worshipful There may not be a lot of empathy toward Rand, but there is a great deal of empathy towards those who read her, and the idea of satire does not really capture that expansive work Likewise, with sexual abuse, it is certainly a feature of the experience of the two girls of the title, but it is inscribed within so many other kinds of cruelty and neglect and systematic suffering that saying the book is about sexual abuse seems to me to somehow miss the point It s about abuse, some of which is sexual in nature, and which is pervasive and all encompassing and inescapable This is my second Gaitskill, and I wonder why she does not have a larger place in our conversations about literature Reading her is not really comfortable, and I don t think everyone will like her, but what she writes seems to me to stand on its own, and to fill a space of things we don t necessarily talk much about Perhaps the problem is with my own reading, rather than the larger conversation, I don t know


  5. says:

    This book punches you repeatedly in the solar plexus with the full force of human horribleness It s also about sympathy, connection, and understanding.


  6. says:

    A peculiar novel.I feel so defensive about liking Mary Gaitskill.


  7. says:

    i turned to this in order to escape from Blood Meridian which i hate a lot and think i might not finish at all , and at first it was refreshing to encounter female characters with interiority and subjective emotions, etc for some reason, father daughter sexual abuse ispalatable to me than diseased horses with swollen heads and drunk white dudes who kill random mexicans for no reason.i read this quickly and remained fully engaged even on crowded subway rides but in retrospect, i am not s i turned to this in order to escape from Blood Meridian which i hate a lot and think i might not finish at all , and at first it was refreshing to encounter female characters with interiority and subjective emotions, etc for some reason, father daughter sexual abuse ispalatable to me than diseased horses with swollen heads and drunk white dudes who kill random mexicans for no reason.i read this quickly and remained fully engaged even on crowded subway rides but in retrospect, i am not sure this novel is entirely successful the structural device switching between 1st and 3rd person narrators never made sense to me and i kept waiting for it to do so it wouldn t be so bothersome if it were merely an aesthetic flourish, but the entire project of this book seems to be to draw connections between these two different characters, which begs too many questions regarding justine s lack of narrative voice over, the execution seems flawed, since the narrative VOICE remains absolutely the same even when the narrator AND the point of view change how does that make sense is the omniscient narrator actually dorothy is justine invented by dorothy is dorothy s subjective voice being written by justine none of those options would feel satisfying, but what s worse is there is no answer to the conundrum at times, the writing is eh adverby but the nuances of complex emotion are made palpable by gaitskill s observations and depicted with killer accuracy at least, they ring true for me and what i know about female psychology regarding self worth, sexuality, identity, intimacy, and survival instinct justine s adolescent cruelty dorothy s ability to insulate herself from external reality these are profound constructs i just don t know how soon i ll be ready to read another gaitskill highly recommended for lovers of melodrama, since this is definitely a step up from v.c andrews


  8. says:

    I liked this intimate look at two women, both ill at ease in the world, who make a strange connection We get very close to them from childhood on, and their encounters with each other vibrate with their past experiences Dorothy was an abused child, while Justine was both abused and an abuser, but one whose flashes of empathy leave her open to redemption The story takes off after Justine, a freelance journalist secretary, contacts Dorothy for an interview about Definitism, the philosophy of I liked this intimate look at two women, both ill at ease in the world, who make a strange connection We get very close to them from childhood on, and their encounters with each other vibrate with their past experiences Dorothy was an abused child, while Justine was both abused and an abuser, but one whose flashes of empathy leave her open to redemption The story takes off after Justine, a freelance journalist secretary, contacts Dorothy for an interview about Definitism, the philosophy of Anna Granite, a stand in for Ayn Rand Dorothy is an obese 20 something and follower of Granite s philosophy, while Justine is an alienated character with an interest in degrading and dangerous sex Justine s article, published near the end of the book, enrages Dorothy, who decides immediately upon reading it to track Justine down and vent her anger The ending was a surprise to me.I admit I didn t get off to a good start with the book I thought I d be modifier d out by page 12 or so, but the feeling abated as the story developed


  9. says:

    I chose Two Girls, Fat and Thin for our book club The League of Unreliable Narrators, aka Chicagiforifiction because I hadn t read any Mary Gaitskill, and I d heard good things about both this, her debut novel, and her breakout short story collection, Bad Behavior I didn t know much except that it had some pretty explicit S M, and was partially about an Ayn Rand like writer and political thinker named Anna Granite So, off we went into the woods of self hate and Definitism.To start with, the I chose Two Girls, Fat and Thin for our book club The League of Unreliable Narrators, aka Chicagiforifiction because I hadn t read any Mary Gaitskill, and I d heard good things about both this, her debut novel, and her breakout short story collection, Bad Behavior I didn t know much except that it had some pretty explicit SM, and was partially about an Ayn Rand like writer and political thinker named Anna Granite So, off we went into the woods of self hate and Definitism.To start with, the Rand stuff is on the nose, so literally ported from both the literature and the beliefs of the most revered saint among American assholes, it could only have been changed in name due to threats of lawsuit I would have loved if Gaitskill had tweaked the mythology a bit, but it s pretty much a 1 1 conversion.With that as a backdrop, we get the account of Dorothy Never born Dorothy Footie , a devout follower of Anna Granite, and journalist Justine Shade, who is working on an expose of the since repudiated Definitist movement This is all in the first 30 pages The two have a meeting, and it s clear that 1 Justine isn t in it to show the world how misunderstood the poor Definitists are, and 2 Dorothy thinks that s exactly what Justine is doing They leave with those contrasting thoughts in their head, and that s the last of the present we see for quite some time.Gaitskill sends us back 18 to 20 years, to the childhoods of both Dorothy and Justine, in a long, long, LONG section intended to give the background of how these two people became who they are Both are both victims of abuse Justine was molested by a friend of her father s Dorothy by her own father, repeatedly, for years , and both spent time not only as victim but also as aggressor The book is full of long, lurid, disquieting sections about the brutality of girl cliques, everyone either tormenting physically or emotionally, often to the point of suicide or relocation to a new school Gaitskill is unforgiving here, and the girls childhoods, which often blur together on purpose, I suspect , are full of domineering fathers, heaps of abuse, and coping mechanisms that often include transferring that abuse to people even weaker And not only is it hard reading, there is a LOT of it It wouldn t have takenthan adding a hundred extra pages to cut this section out of the novel and making it its own gruesome little coming of age novel.With this much riding on the past, I assumed that, as we return to the present, Gaitskill would use all this fuel like a rocket booster, the pain and loathing of the past guiding the decisions of the present day.But she never really does Whether disinterest in the subject or simply the pacing issues of a debut novel, the two parts never really join together As such, all of the fuel Gaitskill has poured in doesn t fire the rocket into the stratosphere, but causes it to explode on the launch pad.The interview continues, and Dorothy begins to obsess over Justine and how her article will return Definitism to its rightful place in American thought even though Anna Granite has been dead for several years, Dorothy is still a true believer while Justine finds herself embroiled in an increasingly dangerous sexual relationship The SM sections are gnarly and emphatically in violation of The Rules, so to speak When the article on Definitism is published, Dorothy reads it, and she isn t happy Her final encounter with Justine comprises the fever pitched conclusion to the book Of that, I won t say any .There was a lot I liked here Despite the explicitness of the coming of age section, and its absurd length, I can t think of too many books that have really poked that deep into the heart of adolescent anger and barbarism If this doesn t look like how you remember junior high and high school, congratulations on having a much better adjusted childhood than I did Gaitskill shows the ease in which kids, in search of their identity and seeking a step up in the pecking order, fall easily into prejudice, bullying, conformity, and close mindedness It wasn t pretty, but I didn t find it lurid or unrealistic, either The place where it really falls down is connecting this to the rest of the book The Definitism article Justine writes is comedically histrionic what paper would allow a part time freelancer with few credits to her name to write a full length expose of a major political movementor less unsupervised The sections we read over Dorothy s shoulder have the marks of an amateur hack, going for easy comparison s like an encapsulation of the right wing id gone mad I mean, fair enough, but where s the craft It doesn t ring true, unless it s meant to be a half assed expose As for the resolution, I was surprised at how sudden it was After the elongated explanations throughout the book, all the development of motives and shared histories, the last 15 pages have the feel of five minutes until pencils down, class It just lands with a wet thud It doesn t belong as the cap to such an otherwise potent, if uneven, narrative The writing is tremendous and even funny, on occasion everywhere but at the very end.I can t say I entirely enjoyed this and I don t expect I ll ever read it again , but I admired an awful lot of it, even if I did so with fingers half over my eyes It s a rough go, but its biggest sin is that it doesn t really do all that much with all the atrocity We had a lot to discuss at our book club including W s great tagline At last, the book the answers the age old question, What Kind of Sick Fuck Reads Ayn Rand , but nobody really came away feeling very good about the whole thing


  10. says:

    With the caveat that I would probably not choose to read this a second time this is a dense, dark, dramatic but not unrealistic look at the traumas of girlhood, in all of their forms As one might expect from the title, Gaitskill s major points of exploration are body image, sexuality, and gendered power struggles, all sort of brilliantly set against the backdrop of a fictional Ayn Rand character and her work The most recommendable thing about this book is Gaitskill s writing She s a writer With the caveat that I would probably not choose to read this a second time this is a dense, dark, dramatic but not unrealistic look at the traumas of girlhood, in all of their forms As one might expect from the title, Gaitskill s major points of exploration are body image, sexuality, and gendered power struggles, all sort of brilliantly set against the backdrop of a fictional Ayn Rand character and her work The most recommendable thing about this book is Gaitskill s writing She s a writer of literary fiction, but she never makes a stretch of a metaphor or settles for cliche There was no descriptive sentence that I couldn t get behind, because they all accurately described the viscera of the feeling in ways that I might not have considered, but seemed fitting Her writing is clear and easy to read But the story is not so easy to read except for the Anna Granite Ayn Rand parts, which can be funny Both main characters have been sexually abused, which shapes their personalities and the way they relate to each other It s an interesting concept, but as you can probably imagine, depressing And again, dense given how deeply Gaitskill goes into their lives and memories Worth reading once to perceive little moments as Gaitskill does But I don t think I d have the energy to read it again

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