Kingdoms of Elfin Epub â Kingdoms of Epub /

Kingdoms of Elfin✅ Kingdoms of Elfin pdf ✈ Author Sylvia Townsend Warner – Varanus.us Elfindom is an aristocratic society, jealous of its privileges The ruling classes engage in such pursuits as patronizing the arts or hunting with the Royal Pack of Werewolves, while the lower orders t Elfindom is an aristocratic society, jealous of its privileges The ruling classes engage in such pursuits as patronizing the arts or hunting with the Royal Pack of Werewolves, while the lower orders take pleasure in conducting brutal raiding parties into the world to torment mortalsThe Kingdoms of Elfin are diverse and widely scattered than is often thought from the Welsh Elfins who, though constitutionally incapable of faith, remove mountains, and the elegant and witty French Court of Broc liande where castration almost becomes Kingdoms of Epub / a vogue, to the Kingdom of Zuy in the Low Countries, trafficking suppositories and religious picturesSylvia Townsend Warner s richly exuberant imagination combined with the calm precision of her language conjures up a sublunary realm that is entirely convincing.

Kingdoms of Elfin Epub â Kingdoms of  Epub /
  • Hardcover
  • 222 pages
  • Kingdoms of Elfin
  • Sylvia Townsend Warner
  • English
  • 24 November 2019
  • 067041350X

    10 thoughts on “Kingdoms of Elfin Epub â Kingdoms of Epub /


  1. says:

    This is a reread of a favorite book Good lord, Warner s stylistic control is perfect, I am at her feet Unfortunately the book is so much its own strange creature that there s very little it can offer to modern genre fiction its blood is a compound of dew, soot, and aconite, and it does not easily breed.


  2. says:

    Sylvia Townsend Warner has to be one of my favourite writers I haven t come across fiction that I viscerally loved as much as Kingdoms of Elfin for quite a while I read most of it last night, after getting home from work to find the internet not working TalkTalk had decided to cut me off from Brexit coverage and I was grateful for it In fact, it s the happiest I ve ever been about an outage I listened to the prog rock musical of War of the Worlds on the record player and delighted in thes Sylvia Townsend Warner has to be one of my favourite writers I haven t come across fiction that I viscerally loved as much as Kingdoms of Elfin for quite a while I read most of it last night, after getting home from work to find the internet not working TalkTalk had decided to cut me off from Brexit coverage and I was grateful for it In fact, it s the happiest I ve ever been about an outage I listened to the prog rock musical of War of the Worlds on the record player and delighted in these elegant, acidic short stories The obvious comparison is Jonathan Strange Mr Norrell, which has a similar subject and wit The writing style, however, is very different While Susanne Clarke crafts an amusing pastiche of fussy early Victorian narration, Warner has cool acuity that recalls Saki The stories are linked by recurring characters, but disdain the bourgeois superstition of linear time just as their subjects do Warner s fairies aren t as actively nefarious as Clarke s, although they exhibit a sometimes shocking callousness towards humans, animals, and each other The humans aren t much better, however, and some of the worst fairy behaviour in the book comes of them imitating humans The two introductions to the edition I read weren t hugely enlightening overall, but did comment that Warner s approach is rather ethnographic This is certainly the case in The Corner That Held Them, a similarly detached narrative about a 14th century convent Throughout both books, the characters rotate in and out while incident succeeds incident It s a very decentralised approach to storytelling, one that emphasises atmosphere and institutions over individuals That Warner creates such fascinating fiction while defying the conventions of plotting and characterisation really emphasises what a great writer she is Her deft treatment of heavy themes, religion in particular, her deadpan humour, and her artful way with words set her apart Each of her novels has a very different setting, but I gather they all share this striking sensibility Those that I ve read so far have been enchanting.Before I start quoting my favourite phrases, it s worth noting that I did not experience Kingdoms of Elfin as a book of short stories As the atmosphere and milieu are so recognisably consistent throughout, I read them as a single novel told in nonlinear fashion I liked thisthan standard short story collections, which I rarely find satisfying unless written by Borges I couldn t tell you which story was my favourite, as that would be akin to picking a favourite chapter in a novel Considering them separately seems inappropriate, as they all fit together so well Onto some quotes that caught my eye For his part, Master Blackbone was delighted with an assistant who was so quick to learn, so free from prejudice, and, above all, a fairy To employ a fairy was a step up in the world In London practice every reputable necromancer kept a spiritual appurtenance fairy, familiar, talking toad, airy consultant When he had accumulated the money, he would set up in London, where there is always room for another marvel One day in early Spring the Queen was bitten by a mouse.The result was totally unforeseen Exhausted by the cares of sovereignty, Balsamine decided to go for a rest cure to Bad Nixenbach, the fashionable Elfin health resort The greater part of the court went with her, for she did not wish to travel like a nobody Those she discarded remained at Wirre Gedanken, with a small staff and on the equivalent of board wages.The discards were named Ludo, Moor, Tinkel, Nimmerlein, and Banian Ludo was her Consort Moor, Tinkel, and Nimmerlein had been at various times royal Favourites All had proved disappointments and were now middle aged Banian was young and slender, and had been chosen to make one of her party till at the last moment he became a disappointment by coming out in an anxiety rash Apart from the element of piety, court life at Broc liande was much the same as in other Kingdoms There were fashions of the moment collecting butterflies, determining the pitch of birdsongs, table turning, cat races, purifying the language, building card castles There were expeditions to the coast to watch shipwrecks, summer picnics in the forest, deer hunts with the Royal Pack of Werewolves It was of a crawfish souffl that Count Luxus committed his only metaphor It is like eating a cloud, he said His cousin Count Brock, who had asearching mind, replied, But, unlike a cloud, it nourishes The only person at Dreiviertelstein unmoved by Ludla s cooking was Queen Aigle For her, meals recurred like sunrise and sunset If a sauce had been curdled, a dumpling petrified, she would have acknowledged its cometlike apparition without feeling personally involved The reflection of her earrings flitted about the room like butterflies as she nodded in satisfaction Rats are wise animals, they know when to move out they are not immune to mortal diseases as fairies are If the pestilence came to the very gates of Bourrasque, if the dying, frantic with pain, leaped over the palace wall, if the dead had to be raked into heaps under their noses, no fairy would be a penny the worse Her court was glad to think this was so but wished there could be a change of subject My vow forbids me to fly Your vow My vow of poverty, chastity, and gravity Gravity But you laugh, you tell funny stories Gravitational gravity I do not leave the ground And of course that perfect phrase which I couldn t help mentioning in an update the sea, looking like ships wouldn t melt in its mouth Flicking through the book to choose quotes proved challenging, given that practically every paragraph merits acknowledgement of its insight, amusement, strangeness, or beauty Kingdoms of Elfin is quite simply brilliantly written throughout In a few deceptively incidental tales, the reader sees the shape of a parallel European history of fairies The telling of these tales is evocative and clever, full of snide commentary on politics, class, romance, cookery, and much else besides


  3. says:

    I enjoyed Kingdoms of Elfin, a quirky, unusual collection of short stories recounting life among the various kingdoms queendoms, actually of Faerie.Of the sixteen stories, my favorites were The Revolt at Broceliande, which recounts the precarious position of mortal changelings in a fey court The Search for an Ancestress, where a European fairy, Joost, learns how dangerous it can be to return to one s homeland The Occupation, another tale of the dangers of mortal infatuation with Faerie, I enjoyed Kingdoms of Elfin, a quirky, unusual collection of short stories recounting life among the various kingdoms queendoms, actually of Faerie.Of the sixteen stories, my favorites were The Revolt at Broceliande, which recounts the precarious position of mortal changelings in a fey court The Search for an Ancestress, where a European fairy, Joost, learns how dangerous it can be to return to one s homeland The Occupation, another tale of the dangers of mortal infatuation with Faerie, which can only lead to tragedy in this case, a trip to Bedlam Foxcastle, another example of man s fundamental incapacity to understand elf, and vice versa.The elves of these stories are not the un Fallen Men of Tolkien s Middle Earth nor the humans with funny ears who populate far too many fantasy novels Rather, they re the amoral, soul less bogies that inhabit the woods and wastes of Medieval Europe In my experience, the author who most closely captures the otherworldliness alienness that Warner obtains is Tad Williams in his Memory, Sorrow Thorn Shadowmarch and The War of the Flowers novels


  4. says:

    A glorious collection of stories, reminiscent of Susanna Clarke s The Ladies of Grace Adieu and Other Stories, and of Mervyn Peake my only experience with his writing being Gormenghast , and to some extent


  5. says:

    KINGDOMS OF ELFIN, by Sylvia Townsend WarnerLet us establish this at the very beginning these are not Tolkien s elves, neither the noble and aloof elves of The Lord of the Rings, not the passionate and reckless elves of the Silmarillion Where they are passionate, it is of another type altogether They are sophisticated, fashionable creatures, egotistical, and selfish, and even though capable of intense attachments, they are generally fickle essentially a cold hearted species The stories in t KINGDOMS OF ELFIN, by Sylvia Townsend WarnerLet us establish this at the very beginning these are not Tolkien s elves, neither the noble and aloof elves of The Lord of the Rings, not the passionate and reckless elves of the Silmarillion Where they are passionate, it is of another type altogether They are sophisticated, fashionable creatures, egotistical, and selfish, and even though capable of intense attachments, they are generally fickle essentially a cold hearted species The stories in this collection are full of whimsy and humor, but often of an uncomfortable kind.Warner s style is elegant, simple yet very detailed As much of the story is in these details beguiling if you love that sort of thing, tedious if you don t as it is in the actual events If you don t like her style you will not like these stories, and vice versa There is no author behind the scenes winking at the audience as if to say, do not take these stories seriously Very little is played for laughs There is no need the irony and the absurdity speak for themselves If you are a fan of broad humor, it is likely that you will not enjoy these stories In the course of this collection, we visit a number of different realms, located in our own world but invisible to human eyes Each of these realms is distinctive, both like and unlike the mortal realms in which they are located Into their own world they may occasionally admit mortals, but almost always in infancy as changelings, who live among the fairies only so long as they remain young enough to be comely Then they are discarded during a sort of fairy house cleaning, and sent back into a world they neither know nor understand Of the fairy children who are exchanged for them robbed of their immortality, knowing nothing of their true origins there is only one story describing the fate of a single individual Yet if Warner s fairies are cruel, it is a heedless cruelty, rarely calculated they simply don t think beyond what they wantElfhame strikes cold,says a fairy nursemaid, and that is no exaggeration at all Though all these stories have a decided charm of their own, there is as you may have gathered by now frequently a darkness behind the humor and the glittering fa ade, for Warner s fairies seem to know nothing of morality, and only the rules of courtly behavior For the most part, the elfin nobles are caught up in the idle pastimes and seasonal fads of the various courts, but they are also prone to sudden enthusiasms, sometimes for quite mundane hobbies like fishing or embroidery This is but one of their many contradictions Slightly smaller than humans, they are winged but do not fly This is reserved for servant fairies, who must be agile and swift indeed to satisfy the whims of their betters Flying, you see, is considered vulgar for the upper classes though the temptation to take flight is sometimes over mastering, and practiced in secret by those who can t resist.The title is a deceptive, for these realms of Faerie are ruled exclusively ruled by females As a race, they are are often infertile, and succession to the crown is not hereditary, so infidelity is hardly an issue though they do marry Queens take lovers, but their attention soon wanders elsewhere, and really, they are so autocratic and exacting, it seems to me that it must come as a relief to her husband or her lover when a queen decides to lavish her affection on another Yet the title of Favorite, when it is bestowed, is envied by all As in so much else, pride seems to take precedence over practicality If you are still reading, yet have never known the delights of these sophisticated little tales, if you have never experienced the transitory pleasures of a mortal in Elfin realms, then you would do well to seek them out, but the book is not easy to find, and the individual stories are scattered through numerous collections and anthologies


  6. says:

    This one took a long, long time for me to finish, and I have a feeling I ll be pondering it for quite some time to come It wasn t the quality of the writing at fault for my slowness in reading, oh noeach of these stories is full of splendid, glittering prose Most of them managed to disturb me in some way Not in an overtly horrifying way, like Poe s short stories It s just that the fairies of Sylvia Townsend Warner s Kingdoms of Elfin which should really be Queendoms of Elfin , but our This one took a long, long time for me to finish, and I have a feeling I ll be pondering it for quite some time to come It wasn t the quality of the writing at fault for my slowness in reading, oh noeach of these stories is full of splendid, glittering prose Most of them managed to disturb me in some way Not in an overtly horrifying way, like Poe s short stories It s just that the fairies of Sylvia Townsend Warner s Kingdoms of Elfin which should really be Queendoms of Elfin , but our benighted language has no such word are so cold Cold, if beautiful, creatures Ice cold Snow cold Diamond cold Not cruel, necessarily Justcareless Oblivious Oblivious to each other s or to mortal feelings, and to the sufferings they cause the mortals that they abduct or otherwise tamper with on their journeys For some reason, Fitzgerald s description of Tom and Daisy Buchanan in The Great Gatsby kept springing to mind They were careless people, Tom and Daisy they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back to their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made So with the royalty of the Fairy Courts Most of these Fairy tales are grimly, grotesquely comic little tragedies None of them has what you might call a happy ending I found myself breathing a sigh of relief when, Hey Nobody died In some hideous or just really careless way In this one, anyway Makes the Fairies of other tales seem positively shining with benevolence by comparison If you are an aficianado of the modern fairy story and you haven t read this collection, stop what you re doing and order it It s worth reading for the sheer quality of the writing That s what I end up coming back to, what kept me going Sylvia Townsend Warner manages to take the tone of an omniscient, polite, slightly jaded Court historian, or perhaps court stenographer, and make it shine Just don t make the mistake of looking for her Broceliande, or any of her other Queen Kingdoms like the hapless scholar of the last story, your encounter with Fair Folk may not turn out like you hopedjust because you re a fan of theirs , doesn t make them a fan of yours You ve been warned


  7. says:

    Deeply strange and often amazing but rarely enchanting if there can be such a thing as a clear headed, unsentimental study of a phenomenon that doesn t exist, then this 20th century English author and formidable fantasist Lolly Willowes, Mr Fortune s Maggot has accomplished exactly that Kingdoms of Elfin consists of sixteen stories most of which appeared in the New Yorker in the early to mid 1970 s Warner s last work it was published posthumously in 1977.The stories are loosely linked an o Deeply strange and often amazing but rarely enchanting if there can be such a thing as a clear headed, unsentimental study of a phenomenon that doesn t exist, then this 20th century English author and formidable fantasist Lolly Willowes, Mr Fortune s Maggot has accomplished exactly that Kingdoms of Elfin consists of sixteen stories most of which appeared in the New Yorker in the early to mid 1970 s Warner s last work it was published posthumously in 1977.The stories are loosely linked an occasional character will appear inthan one story, a couple of courts are the settings for multiple stories With the exception of one set partly in Persia, they take place in various Elvin Kingdoms located in Western Europe from the late middle ages to just before the end of the 19th century These small separate realms remind me of the jigsaw puzzle of tiny states that made up so much of Central Europe before the late 19th century Each has its own customs and traditions For instance the kingdom that considers itself the most sophisticated and has the most elaborate etiquette is famous for its hunting pack of werewolves The fairies are not immortal they live for centuries and have no souls They have wings but using them is distinctly d class Only servants are supposed to fly Fairy magic is rudimentary and they are feckless, easily distracted, casually cruel to the humans they encounter and occasionally abduct.An adventurous fairy in the 17th century travels from the mortal land of Holland to Persia the place where his race originated There he encounters and barely escapes astounding magic and savage cruelty The inhabitants of the Elvin Kingdoms, perhaps by interaction with humans, arelike mortals than they are like their ancestors


  8. says:

    A collection of wickedly witty stories about an imagined world of Elfin kingdoms though they are all ruled by rather fickle queens, and their kings tend to be in rather precarious positions.Although mainly about the Elfin aristocracy, there is also a rag tag collection of common elfins, changelings, werewolves and humans to add a little breadth and depth The locales are mainly northern Europe, with the occasional excursion to eastern Europe and the Near East The time is vaguely 13th to 17th A collection of wickedly witty stories about an imagined world of Elfin kingdoms though they are all ruled by rather fickle queens, and their kings tend to be in rather precarious positions.Although mainly about the Elfin aristocracy, there is also a rag tag collection of common elfins, changelings, werewolves and humans to add a little breadth and depth The locales are mainly northern Europe, with the occasional excursion to eastern Europe and the Near East The time is vaguely 13th to 17th century it doesn t really matter to the elfins as they live for hundreds, possibly thousands, of years.These aren t jolly gnomes and fairies, nor noble elves battling evil goblins the elfins are selfish, untrustworthy, cruel and unpredictable, all beneath a veneer of courtly manners and tradition.The stories read like folktales, and like such they often end suddenly leaving you wantingThe endings are rarely good ones for the protagonists, few coming away unscathed, though you can never be quite sure I like this, as nothing is guaranteed and you usually can t predict at least I couldn t which way the stories will run.Fantasy and folklore, murder and the macabre, wonder and wit brilliant


  9. says:

    Beautiful, strange and ephemeral stories.


  10. says:

    In 2006, while I was reading The Ladies of Grace Adieu, I happened to meet Susanna Clarke s husband through a mutual friend And I said to him how, for all the fantasy I d read, I d never encountered anything quite like hers was he aware of much that had influenced her, or came anywhere near it And he recommended this book, which of course I then sought out But the time frame here might clue you in that I didn t devour it like I did Clarke s too few books I can certainly see a glancing rese In 2006, while I was reading The Ladies of Grace Adieu, I happened to meet Susanna Clarke s husband through a mutual friend And I said to him how, for all the fantasy I d read, I d never encountered anything quite like hers was he aware of much that had influenced her, or came anywhere near it And he recommended this book, which of course I then sought out But the time frame here might clue you in that I didn t devour it like I did Clarke s too few books I can certainly see a glancing resemblance in this rather chill vision of the good folk, who at times suggest 18th century courtiers taken to their illogical conclusion creatures at once fickle and fixated, beset by baffling social restrictions only the low born amongst them fly , callous gossips among whom possessing a soul seems the grossest trespass And Warner has a waspish wit and a black humour which keep these curious tales like fables without morals ticking along nicely But from great Broceliande to the parochial kingdom of Catmere, there s too much 1 1 substitution of the appurtenances of mortal aristocracy not a one of these elfin lands has the grand strangeness and dark power of Clarke s Lost Hope

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