Constructing Jesus: Memory, Imagination, and History MOBI

Constructing Jesus: Memory, Imagination, and History➥ [Ebook] ➠ Constructing Jesus: Memory, Imagination, and History By Dale C. Allison Jr. ➯ – Varanus.us What did Jesus think of himself How did he face death What were his expectations of the future In this volume, internationally renowned Jesus scholar Dale Allison Jr addresses such perennially fascina What did Jesus think of himself How Memory, Imagination, PDF ´ did he face death What were his expectations of the future In this volume, internationally renowned Jesus scholar Dale Allison Jr addresses such perennially fascinating questions about JesusRepresenting the fruit of several decades of research, this major work questions standard approaches to Jesus studies and rethinks our knowledge Constructing Jesus: MOBI :µ of the historical Jesus in light of recent progress in the scientific study of memory Allison s groundbreaking alternative strategy calls for applying what we know about the function of human memory to our reading of the Gospels in order to construct Jesus soundly.

Constructing Jesus: Memory, Imagination, and History MOBI
  • Hardcover
  • 588 pages
  • Constructing Jesus: Memory, Imagination, and History
  • Dale C. Allison Jr.
  • English
  • 22 June 2017
  • 0801035856

    10 thoughts on “Constructing Jesus: Memory, Imagination, and History MOBI


  1. says:

    A fascinating and provocative book, rich with humility and honesty I disagreed with much of Allison s conclusions I do not believe in Q, for example, and I think history and theology are farmixed than e seems to think , but this was a helpful and critical work I shall return sometime to give it a deserved second reading.


  2. says:

    This is an excellent work on the historical Jesus Allison has managed to combine a sound historical approach with insights from memory studies, and came up with an entirely plausible reconstruction of Jesus I read it in preparation of a class, and can recommend it wholeheartedly.


  3. says:

    Dale Allison is tied with our own Joel Marcus for asking the most interesting questions about the New Testament.


  4. says:

    Historical, redaction, and form critics have long been preoccupied with establishing knowledge of the historical Jesus through an analysis of, and judgment concerning, individual sayings and pericope found in the Gospels and other early sources Allison, refreshingly admitting to disillusionment with these practices and the quality of the results they produce, has attempted to set a new course Rather than dissecting each individual piece of information, Allison sought to engage with the overall Historical, redaction, and form critics have long been preoccupied with establishing knowledge of the historical Jesus through an analysis of, and judgment concerning, individual sayings and pericope found in the Gospels and other early sources Allison, refreshingly admitting to disillusionment with these practices and the quality of the results they produce, has attempted to set a new course Rather than dissecting each individual piece of information, Allison sought to engage with the overall structure and testimony of the texts, in order to establish the legacy of Jesus as found in the tradition Even if individual pericope or sayings cannot be validated or invalidated with certainty, the overall tradition must be able to provide some confidence regarding what the earliest followers of Jesus believed about him, and this belief, when taken based on broad, verifiable impressions, is likely to lead us closer to the truth about Jesus than other sorts of analysis.An example considers Jesus as a millennarian prophet, which Allison writes about extensively here and in other books Although we cannot cast proper judgment on the historicity of any one eschatological saying, we can be sure, by the overwhelming volume of eschatological sayings attributed to Jesus, that eschatology was an important feature of his teaching We can even be fairly sure of the flavor of his eschatology Other examples abound I ve said this many times, and every time I finish a book by Allison this judgment is confirmed, that regardless of ideological background, I find Allison to be the most fair minded, honest, and balanced scholar writing today He repeatedly makes refreshing admissions about previously published conclusions that he no longer agrees with, and repeatedly confesses his own ignorance or lack of confidence in his conclusions always with great insight as to why he might be wrong , and he is always fair to scholars from varying positions, regardless of how much he disagrees with them All of this has been a great model for me in my own academic work With great length, it was inevitable that I would find things to disagree with, and I disagreed within this work than any Allison book I ve read thus far And yet, I always found each of his points well reasoned, and backed by a truly staggering knowledge of both primary and secondary material His opening discussion on memory and oral tradition needs to be heard by all researchers of Jesus, and the employment of such ideas must be engaged This book is massively helpful and I recommend it highly.Although erudite, I found Allison s attitude to be maybe the most beneficial thing His final paragraph deserves to be quoted and heeded byscholars While I am proudly a historian, I must confess that history is not what matters most If my deathbed finds me alert and not overly racked with pain, I will then be preoccupied with how I have witnessed and embodied faith, hope, and charity I will not be fretting over the historicity of this or that part of the Bible


  5. says:

    Read preface, ch 1, ch 6, parts of all other chapters This is Allison s big book on the historical Jesus Methodologically he distinguishes himself by abandoning the criteria for evaluating the historicity of particular sayings, a task he generally regards as improbably, in favor of focusing on recurrent themes Central to his approach was his reading scientific literature on memory, which suggest to him that Jesus eyewitnesses were likely able to remember the gist of his teaching and dee Read preface, ch 1, ch 6, parts of all other chapters This is Allison s big book on the historical Jesus Methodologically he distinguishes himself by abandoning the criteria for evaluating the historicity of particular sayings, a task he generally regards as improbably, in favor of focusing on recurrent themes Central to his approach was his reading scientific literature on memory, which suggest to him that Jesus eyewitnesses were likely able to remember the gist of his teaching and deeds but not specifics I am only partially convinced by his arguments, which used comparisons that I found dubious e.g., looking for truth in medical meta analyses rather than in individual data points However, once into the meat of the book, Allison demonstrates a truly breathtaking command of primary and secondary sources Most of his arguments for particular points I found extremely compelling.There are a few strange things about the book, though One chapter is 190 pages That s just not how books are supposed to be written Some of the sections also look like direct downloads from Allison s brain, just tons of data splattered on the page to be sorted out later Overall I think this book is very important for people doing scholarly work on the historical Jesus, but others should steer clear of it


  6. says:

    Easily my favorite book on the historical Jesusat this point in my life Allison focuses upon doing the historian s task with a nod to memory studies Instead of attempting to isolate and authenticate the historicity of this or that part of the broader Jesus Tradition he focuses instead on reoccuring themes that emerge from the overarching Jesus Tradition I found his approach to be satisfying and honest.


  7. says:

    The best historical Jesus book I ve read

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