The Garden of Blue Roses PDF ☆ The Garden MOBI

The Garden of Blue Roses[PDF / Epub] ☁ The Garden of Blue Roses By Michael Barsa – Varanus.us A car lies at the bottom of an icy ravine Slumped over the steering wheel, dead, is the most critically acclaimed horror writer of his time Was it an accident His son Milo doesn t care For the first t A car lies at the of Blue PDF Ê bottom of an icy ravine Slumped over the steering wheel, dead, is the most critically acclaimed horror writer of his time Was it an accident His son Milo doesn t care For the first time in his life, he s free No nightmarish readings, spooky animal rites, or moonlit visions of his father in the woods with a notebook and vampire make upOr so he thinksMilo settles into a quiet routine constructing model Greek warships The Garden MOBI :µ and at last building a relationship with his sister Klara, who s home after a failed marriage and brief career as an English teacher Then Klara hires a gardener to breathe new life into their overgrown estate There s something odd about him something eerily reminiscent of their father s most violent villain Or is Milo imagining things He s not sure That all changes the day the gardener discovers something startling in the woods Suddenly Milo is fighting for his Garden of Blue eBook ✓ life, forced to confront the power of fictional identity as he uncovers the shocking truth about his own dysfunctional family and the supposed accident that claimed his parents lives.

The Garden of Blue Roses PDF ☆ The Garden  MOBI
  • Paperback
  • 248 pages
  • The Garden of Blue Roses
  • Michael Barsa
  • English
  • 26 October 2017
  • 1630230618

    10 thoughts on “The Garden of Blue Roses PDF ☆ The Garden MOBI


  1. says:

    I didn t trust his death Father was an author He was words You can t kill words can t lock them up and drive them off a cliff The Crane children were raised on tales such as Charles Maturin s Melmoth the Wanderer, Bram Stoker s Dracula, and Matthew Lewis s The Monk Not to mention the lurid tales of Edgar Allan Poe The virus of fear was planted in their lives early, and the tendrils of dread have spread into every nook and cranny of their brains, coloring everything they see with s I didn t trust his death Father was an author He was words You can t kill words can t lock them up and drive them off a cliff The Crane children were raised on tales such as Charles Maturin s Melmoth the Wanderer, Bram Stoker s Dracula, and Matthew Lewis s The Monk Not to mention the lurid tales of Edgar Allan Poe The virus of fear was planted in their lives early, and the tendrils of dread have spread into every nook and cranny of their brains, coloring everything they see with sepia tones of gothic gloom, creaking stairs, window rattling angst What is real What is mere fabrication from a vivid imagination I wonder about that all the time Did I really see that, andimportantly, did I interpret what I saw correctly The spectres of ghosts and the antics of hobgoblins often seem to dance and skitter about on the edges of my sight A glimpse of something half seen is but fodder for speculation and the inspiration for quills of shivers to prickle my spine Those same quivers of unease frolic along the highways and byways of my neurons as I collect the pieces of this plot to assemble a portrait of insidious intrigue Klara, the daughter, attempts to leave She marries and tries to have a life away from her father, away from the air of apprehension that smothers this house as words of terror trickle down from the attic where John Crane, The John Crane, works on his next creature born of midnight ink and ghostly paper Klara fails to flourish out there She slinks back to the family hearth, bearingunease than when she left, shattered by the knowledge that her world, once large, has shrunk to the confines of her father s existence Milo, the maker of models, is the narrator of our taleI blended flesh cinnabar red, yellow, white, olive green and dipped the brush s tip Now the final touch To breathe life into my lipsThere are varying degrees of strange, and part of the intrigue of this novel is observing enough of Milo s behavior to decide just how odd the young man is He is an unreliable narrator, but at the same time, so compelling that I am continually convinced of his version of events If we think of his life as a mirror reflecting his existence, there is a crack in the corner, and with every creak and groan of the Crane home, that fissure lengthens Everything is fine, well as fine as it can be, until Henri shows up Klara has decided that she wants to build a beautiful garden in honor of their father and mother She hires Henri, who proclaims himself a great artistic gardener, but he seems to have shed his past like a python casting off his old skin Milo is naturally curious and concerned about the influence that Henri so quickly achieves over Klara They are at war from almost the very beginning, a battle for Klara I sent a whisper across his sweat damp back, an insinuated magical word Malevolent I told myself it was a powerful word, one that Father always loved, with its shades of reverent and violent and malignant Yet as soon as I d uttered it, I realized my mistake Because suddenly it wasthan a word More than a spoken one, I mean I saw it hanging in the air like an invisible word cloud What was happening Henri turned and flashed his yellow teeth Then the word was gone, bits of its dismembered letters dribbling down his chin I saw a footless a, severed m, decapitated e I backed up, moved a chair between us, a flimsy barrier that I was sure would do no good Yet I clung to it for something tangible to hold onto Is this how a fictional character reveals himself A character from his father s novels keeps rolling around in Milo s head like a guardian angel of mayhem Keith Sentelle is was a psychotic killer and not a role model for anyone A talon tipped question leaps out of the shadowswho created Keith Sentelle Was it The John Crane Or was it Milo And while we are on this subject, who wrote thewell, I can t really go there.I can t trust what Milo perceives.The flimsy wall between fiction and reality is perforated with large gaping holes, slashes and gashes, rips and tears, and monster spore litters the ground on both sides of the tattered remains of the rampartsthere was Henry walking through a greenhouse in a loose tan shirt with rolled up sleeves I gripped the chair s leather arm But I couldn t look away my curiosity was aroused I found myself searching for stitches, scars, rivets signs that he d been made or the unholy aura of a creature summoned from another world Was the death of the Crane parents an accident There are so many questions that wiggle their way through this plot I hunted those questions with a knife, trying to pin them to the floor or to the door or to the ear of a whore I was careful not to sever them, or one becomes two Answers are untrustworthy These words, paragraphs, pages must be read with a spry mind One cannot remain naive and hope to find a path back to reality I ve seen that people are starting to compare this novel to the works of some of the great psychological horror writers, and they are right in doing so Michael Barsa has written a brilliant novel with so many beautiful layers I would read, ponder, and carefully consider all the suggestions of what has been dangled before me before I would readRarely does this occur to me any, but my first thought after finishing this book wasI need to begin reading this book again Barsa gives many nods to those writers who have come before him and I hope he continues to write in this genre Gothic tales have always been a favorite of mine and I can see Barsa carving out a new genremodern gothic If you wish to seeof my most recent book and movie reviews, visit also have a Facebook blogger page at


  2. says:

    But wait, you say, you re the author Let me explain.Sometimes love happens all at once There it is Boom LOVE Other times it s agradual recognition, a process of allowing yourself to fall into the feeling it s a form of humility really, saying to yourself right here, in this messy reality, is where I ll choose to reside This is how I d describe my complicated feelings about my own writing.For years I would have given everything I wrote one or zero stars, and deservedly so, because f But wait, you say, you re the author Let me explain.Sometimes love happens all at once There it is Boom LOVE Other times it s agradual recognition, a process of allowing yourself to fall into the feeling it s a form of humility really, saying to yourself right here, in this messy reality, is where I ll choose to reside This is how I d describe my complicated feelings about my own writing.For years I would have given everything I wrote one or zero stars, and deservedly so, because for years everything I wrote was terrible I took uncommon glee in reading through a 300 page manuscript that had taken methan a year to write, and deciding that the only thing worth saving was the opening paragraph yes, this happened It s taken a painfully long time to learn to recognize that, well, not EVERYTHING was terrible, that here and there a paragraph or a phrase ormight be salvageable if I only came back to it later with a bitpatience, and that sometimes I ought NOT to trust my most savage and critical instincts In other words, I had to learn to love my creations, to give them a chance, because sometimes good writing doesn t happen all at once, sometimes you ve got to keep coming back again and again and not give up and just hope you reach a point where something breaks through your own skepticism and allows you recognize that yes, this is getting somewhere, and yes, it s not half bad So I m giving this 5 stars because I can finally say I m proud of something I wrote It s not perfect, sure, and it might fail for some, but I love it all the same, because I ve watched it grow up from nothing, from an inchoate burbling notion that I had no idea how to handle into a piece of fiction that now exists on its own in the big bad world, without my worrying and nagging guidance


  3. says:

    Reading American author Michael Barsa s The Garden of Blue Roses, I was thoroughly enchanted Quite the debut novel Since so much of the tale lies in its style as much as its action, other than noting how the story is narrated by twenty something Milo Crane in the aftermath of the death via automobile crash of his mother and father, a popular writer of horror fiction, and the ensuing events he lives through with Klara, his elder sister of seven years, I will link my comments with specific quote Reading American author Michael Barsa s The Garden of Blue Roses, I was thoroughly enchanted Quite the debut novel Since so much of the tale lies in its style as much as its action, other than noting how the story is narrated by twenty something Milo Crane in the aftermath of the death via automobile crash of his mother and father, a popular writer of horror fiction, and the ensuing events he lives through with Klara, his elder sister of seven years, I will link my comments with specific quotes from the book so as to share the distinct flavor of this unique work The crying only became louder Our house has strange echoes It was coming from all over, like the walls themselves were weeping I was tempted to run away, to avoid a future of such sounds If The Garden of Blue Roses was sheer pulp horror fiction, Michael Barsa s inventiveness would be constricted within the boundaries of the genre It is not This is a work of true literature not pulp, thus its subtle poetry touches on the horrific but is not bound by it The Garden of Blue Roses is in stark contrast to The Portrait of the Artist as a Young Psychopath, one of a number of hack works by Milo s father, John Crane, a work cited throughout as literary counterpoint I tried to focus on the trireme, something historical and real, but Father used to say that if you could imagine it, it was real to you, so I closed my eyes and tried to bury my imagination, to shovel it over with great mounds of earth An example of how the story is told with such rich imagery, many passages could be transposed with ease into lyrical poetry Thus my reluctance to merely summarize the bare sequence of happenings Every now and then she kept up the pretense of mothering by insisting we eat supper together I ve never understood this penchant for masticating as a social ritual We don t make other bodily functions like defecation or nose blowing into elaborate occasions of forced togetherness Ah, family Milo provides the backstory, his own as well as other members of his family, to add weight to the unfolding drama Milo was continually picked on and beaten up as a kid at school and when he attended a small liberal arts college for one term, the experience was so hellish he sought a correspondence course offering a college degree Humorously, one of the thuggish dullards Milo was forced to deal with back at that small New England college was a big fan of, you guested it, John Crane horror novels Even in his absence he was everywhere in the creaking floors, the grandfather clock, the footsteps and shadowy trees, in the books crowding the living room shelves and appearing, like not so subtle reminders, on end tables or our pillows before we lay down at night Not just his own books but the ones he thought we ought to read Dickens and Hawthorne and Charles Brockden Brown books to mold our imaginations to some uncertain and terrifying end Any booklover will love the frequent references to authors and titles sprinkled throughout Additionally, in keeping with that longstanding Gothic trope witchcraft, magic and occultism the presence of John Crane continues to manifest inways than one Surfacing from memory is like coming up for air There is that same exhausted relief, the wonder at being alive Also the same moment of doubt, of whether this is really the dream and that other realm, the murky one of shifting shapes and swaying sunbeams, is the one you inhabit When we read typical Gothic horror pulp, do we usually encounter reflections and musings rendered in such beautiful language I don t think so The philosophic dimension of The Garden of Blue Roses was one I found particularly appealing Beauty without context I saw how Klara hung on his every word, how her breath fluttered like an excited bird s Was she blinded by his cheap charm Or by a misguided sense of beauty the prospect of transforming our grounds into some hideous floral theme park Yet again another thread of the this blossoming yarn is the psychological probing into the mind and heart of older sister Klara She looked at me, and that s when something came over her, because she gripped my shoulders hard and continued in a shaky dramatic whisper The devil What s a good ole Gothic tale set in the land of Nathaniel Hawthorne and Young Goodman Brown without at least one reference to the evil one Moreover, that classic Hawthorne is cited directly some tales continue to cast a long shadow, a very long shadow Yes, theI thought about it, theI realized this might be a classic John Crane plot, where nothing was what it seemed Had Father finally realized the power of his fiction the power to literally create a life that leapt off the page and crossed over into the so called real world Oh, my A narrator questioning the solidity of his world Is this beginning to sound like another one of those prime Gothic tropes a confusion over what is real or unreal that just might touch on madness To find out, I highly recommend treating yourself to Michael Barsa s fine novel.American author Michael Barsa, currently living in Chicago with his wife and two children


  4. says:

    This novel took me on a journey that was well out of my comfort zone At the same time, it gripped me so firmly I couldn t put it down.A famous horror writer and his wife are killed in a car accident Somewhere in their 20 s or early 30 s, their daughter, Karla, and son Milo are left to cope with mourning fans, a large house full of haunting memories, and a fortune During the course of the story, we are immersed in one of their father s horror novels as the words all in verses of rhyming coup This novel took me on a journey that was well out of my comfort zone At the same time, it gripped me so firmly I couldn t put it down.A famous horror writer and his wife are killed in a car accident Somewhere in their 20 s or early 30 s, their daughter, Karla, and son Milo are left to cope with mourning fans, a large house full of haunting memories, and a fortune During the course of the story, we are immersed in one of their father s horror novels as the words all in verses of rhyming couplets thread their way through Milo s mind and into their lives during moments of tension.Milo is convinced that a character from his father s novel is being duplicated by a man who finds entry into their lives through Karla s need to restructure and re balance her own life Milo doesn t see her needs in quite that way because he sees darker motives in the man motives that Karla can t or won t see and that become inextricably bound up with the deadly character in their father s horror novel.This family is obviously dysfunctional in so many ways, yet it isthan that They are damaged and although Milo narrates this story, we can see he is damaged, too Extraordinarily intelligent, but damaged.There is tension throughout this story at times barely discernible and ranging all the way to unbearably urgent There are layers upon layers of veils shrouding the people and the events within these pages As those veils are moved aside or torn down one by one, I became completely invested in the characters lives and captured by Milo s mind and how he perceived all that was happening Mr Barsa s writing is exceptional and flawless As complex as this novel is, with so many perceived realities occurring simultaneously, now that it is over I am in awe of what the author accomplished and how exceedingly well it was done.There are triggers within this novel, yet I still highly recommend it as an outstanding read especially if you are brave enough to face triggers head on, with honesty and with compassion.The Garden of Blue Roses is literary fiction in its rarest form superlative


  5. says:

    I once reviewed a book, giving it 2 stars, with a bit of shrill, teenage disappointment tainting my words I was mortified when the author of this book liked my review that day I couldn t sleep that night Why couldn t he have read the review I wrote of his first book that I LOVED Would he ever know how much I admired his work Why oh why did he have to read my pouty review with a laundry list of his sins according to me How would I feel to read a similar review of something I had written I once reviewed a book, giving it 2 stars, with a bit of shrill, teenage disappointment tainting my words I was mortified when the author of this book liked my review that day I couldn t sleep that night Why couldn t he have read the review I wrote of his first book that I LOVED Would he ever know how much I admired his work Why oh why did he have to read my pouty review with a laundry list of his sins according to me How would I feel to read a similar review of something I had written CRINGE I mention this to give you an idea of why the prospect of an author reading my review of their book is daunting, to say the least I wasn t sure how this was going to go, given that I ve known Michael Barsa as a Goodreads friend for the last few years I try to be as honest as possible in my reviews, for better or worse Imagine my deep, flooding relief as I turned the pages of his debut novel, thinking this man can writeAnd then, minutes later I m loving it This tension filled story features Milo, our creepy narrator, who lives with his sister Klara after the mysterious death of their parents It seems like everything is better now, because their father, a famous horror writer, was a damaging man, as ghastly as some of the characters in in his books Milo and Klara s peaceful existence is threatened when Klara hires Henri, a famous garden designer, to work on their property Reality becomes murky The air turns sinister Family secrets are unearthed as the spade digs deeper and it s not a bed of roses Not everyone will get out of this alive.For readers who enjoy the muddy, death infused world of the gothic, this will hit the mark For readers who require a literary infusion in the books they read, you can check that box too It became clear to me that what Michael Barsa has created within these pages is actually a pretty passionate love letter, that goes something like this Dearest Shirley Jackson, To my one and only love Bram Stoker, Mary my darling Shelley, I love you all Sherlock Holmes, Miss Havisham, even you, Mr Hyde, you all Turn my Screws In my words, you and your monsters live on, in a sumptuously decaying shrine of devotion With all my heart, MBCongratulations to Michael Barsa on this book, this love letter, that would have made the recipients proud to receive I m happy to report that in private messages, the author acknowledged and agreed with the points I made We had such a nice conversation Now I will aspire to be as humble, as gracious, as open and as honest as he, if I am ever blessed talented hardworking enough to be published one day


  6. says:

    Ah, the fiction that plays out in our livesand what we believe to be true The power of the written word cannot be denied.A house with its avenues of gaping darkness, a hallway not unlike a gullet, strange echoes, shifting shadows A family with unnatural dynamics lives here Mother and Father are gone now, but grown brother and sister remain Milo is decidedly peculiar He doesn t mix well out in the real world, but is a true talent in other ways Klara is odd, too, but seems to b Ah, the fiction that plays out in our livesand what we believe to be true The power of the written word cannot be denied.A house with its avenues of gaping darkness, a hallway not unlike a gullet, strange echoes, shifting shadows A family with unnatural dynamics lives here Mother and Father are gone now, but grown brother and sister remain Milo is decidedly peculiar He doesn t mix well out in the real world, but is a true talent in other ways Klara is odd, too, but seems to blossom after hiring a French gardener to create a memorial garden for their parents The tone is pitch perfect with this gothic novel, and it leaves the back of my neck prickling even after closing the cover The way in which it is written harkens back to a time when an excess of blood and gore was not necessary in order to produce horror


  7. says:

    I was originally drawn to this book because of the praise it received from Alice Sebold, who wrote a book I really loved called The Lovely Bones That, plus I love all things horror It s a beautifully written novel with unforgettable, poetic prose making me think of the better works of V.C Andrews, and it had me thinking back to all kinds of mystery films, from Alice, Sweet Alice to The Last Will and Testament of Rosalind Leigh because of how well it gives off a romanticized vibe despite its s I was originally drawn to this book because of the praise it received from Alice Sebold, who wrote a book I really loved called The Lovely Bones That, plus I love all things horror It s a beautifully written novel with unforgettable, poetic prose making me think of the better works of V.C Andrews, and it had me thinking back to all kinds of mystery films, from Alice, Sweet Alice to The Last Will and Testament of Rosalind Leigh because of how well it gives off a romanticized vibe despite its shocking and dark content I really loved the characters as well there s something at once likable about most of them and they feel like real people, not just cardboard cutouts My only issue with The Garden of Blue Roses is that it s one of the most disjointed books I ve read in a long time It s not hugely detrimental and didn t stop me from enjoying the story, but it made it confusing to focus on and follow along with in that it jumps from place to place and the content can drag on in some places Still, I really liked this novel and I m really glad to have read it I d recommend it to anybody, even if you re not a horror fan, because it s neither gory nor jarring but instead a very poignant, emotional slow burner story that has something for everyone


  8. says:

    Milo Crane I sort of adore you You re strange, eccentric, and quite funny I enjoyed being inside your head and I do love your dark humor I liked this book but I did find it a bit confusing at times The author definitely keeps you on your toes You never really know what is really happening or who is telling the truth or what is truth and what is imagination It left me at times with my head spinning I didn t really find this book scary at all but it is unsettling at times One thing I do ne Milo Crane I sort of adore you You re strange, eccentric, and quite funny I enjoyed being inside your head and I do love your dark humor I liked this book but I did find it a bit confusing at times The author definitely keeps you on your toes You never really know what is really happening or who is telling the truth or what is truth and what is imagination It left me at times with my head spinning I didn t really find this book scary at all but it is unsettling at times One thing I do need to mention is that Michael Barsa writes so beautifully and for that alone you should read this book Thank you to Edelweiss for providing me with a digital ARC in exchange for my honest review.


  9. says:

    Creepy and slow burning, sometimes funny it ends on a wonderfully unexpected laugh , this gothic novel the first I ve ever read is fun Michael Barsa is a writer s writer, as well as being one of my Goodreads friends And as a writer, I adore the way The Garden of Blue Roses plays with the author created characters dynamic I probably would never have picked this book up if it weren t for the Goodreads connection, and I m so glad I did It is well written, perfectly paced, and literary Much mor Creepy and slow burning, sometimes funny it ends on a wonderfully unexpected laugh , this gothic novel the first I ve ever read is fun Michael Barsa is a writer s writer, as well as being one of my Goodreads friends And as a writer, I adore the way The Garden of Blue Roses plays with the author created characters dynamic I probably would never have picked this book up if it weren t for the Goodreads connection, and I m so glad I did It is well written, perfectly paced, and literary Muchthan a genre novel


  10. says:

    In this excellent story, we meet Milo Crane one of the least reliable unreliable narrators I have encountered thus far In a novel strewn with Gothic touches, there are also other characters who feel less than real at least part of the time Even on the sunny days of this novel, there is a mist over the characters Barsa has created a contemporary Gothic atmosphere in Vermont, basing his tale on the family of a writer of horror novels The physical home carries an aura in its general and specifi In this excellent story, we meet Milo Crane one of the least reliable unreliable narrators I have encountered thus far In a novel strewn with Gothic touches, there are also other characters who feel less than real at least part of the time Even on the sunny days of this novel, there is a mist over the characters Barsa has created a contemporary Gothic atmosphere in Vermont, basing his tale on the family of a writer of horror novels The physical home carries an aura in its general and specific descriptions And the gardenah yes Gardens frequently seem to holdthan beautiful flowers.Without providing excessive plot, I will say that Milo and Klara Crane s famous parents died in a road accident within the first 3 pages of the book All else follows as the questions real and unreal, sane and insane continue unabated to the final page I recommend this book for those who enjoy atmosphere as character, the mysteries of a Gothic novel with an unreliable narrator, not knowing up from down at times as you read, but having that feeling of being compelled by the book and character himself to keep going and find out the truth

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