Tired of Apologizing for a Church I Don't Belong To:

Tired of Apologizing for a Church I Don't Belong To: Spirituality without Stereotypes, Religion without Ranting☉ [PDF / Epub] ☆ Tired of Apologizing for a Church I Don't Belong To: Spirituality without Stereotypes, Religion without Ranting By Lillian Daniel ❤ – Varanus.us WHEN LILLIAN DANIEL APOLOGIZED to a total stranger for every bad thing that had ever been said or done in the name of Christianity, he was surprised that she was responsible for all that The Inquisiti WHEN LILLIAN DANIEL APOLOGIZED to a total Apologizing for ePUB ´ stranger for every bad thing that had ever been said or done in the name of Christianity, he was surprised that she was responsible for all that The Inquisition Don t even raise it, I m way ahead of you I was mad about it before you even heard of it, that s how open minded I am Salem witch trials I know So embarrassing Can I hang out with you anyway You re too kind Religion is responsible for all the wars in history, they would say, and I Tired of ePUB ¹ d respond, You re so right Don t forget imperialism, capitalism, and racism Religion invented those problems too You can tell that because religious people can be found at all their meetings In this book, Daniel argues that it s time for Christians to stop apologizing and realize that how we talk about Christian community matters With disarming candor laced with just the right amount of humor, Daniel urges open minded Christians to explore ways to talk about their faith journeys that are reasonable, rigorous, and realTER THE PUBLICATION of the much talked about When Spiritual But Not of Apologizing for ePUB ☆ Religious Is Not Enough Seeing God In Surprising Places, Even the Church, Lillian Daniel heard from many SBNRs as well as practicing Christians It was the Christians who scolded her for her forthright, unapologetic stand as one who believes that religious community matters The Christians ranted that Christians, by definition, tend to be judgmental, condemning hypocrites, which is why people hate them By saying religion matters, she was judging those who disagree, they said, proving the stereotype of Christians Better to acknowledge all that s wrong with Christianity and its history, then apologize In this book, Daniel shows why it matters how we talk about Christian community while urging open minded Christians to learn better ways to talk about their faith.

    10 thoughts on “Tired of Apologizing for a Church I Don't Belong To:

    Have Kindle books people hate them By saying religion matters, she was judging those who disagree, they said, proving the stereotype of Christians Better to acknowledge all that s wrong with Christianity and its history, then apologize In this book, Daniel shows why it matters how we talk about Christian community while urging open minded Christians to learn better ways to talk about their faith."/>
  1. says:

    A lot of review of things we already know I m not sure it s exactly what it s billed as But I always appreciate Daniels s thoughts.


  2. says:

    In 2014, I read a book called When Spiritual But Not Religious Is Not Enough and thought it was intriguing for the idea that the idea of spiritual, but not religious is not only mainstream now, but also there will come a point where there will be a need for something deeper As I read reviews and saw some blog posts by the author of that book, I saw she was on to something This is why I was excited when I received Tired of Apologizing for a Church I Don t Belong To by Lillian Daniel to read In 2014, I read a book called When Spiritual But Not Religious Is Not Enough and thought it was intriguing for the idea that the idea of spiritual, but not religious is not only mainstream now, but also there will come a point where there will be a need for something deeper As I read reviews and saw some blog posts by the author of that book, I saw she was on to something This is why I was excited when I received Tired of Apologizing for a Church I Don t Belong To by Lillian Daniel to read for review This is a follow up of sorts to her previous book, but focusing on the rising group of the nones The nones are the people who have checked the word none under religious affiliation Daniel further subcategorizes the nones into 4 different types no longer, no way, never have, and not yet She looks briefly at each group and talks about how churches continue to do the same thing to attract these groups, yet don t really understand who they are She uses a great analogy of a lifelong baseball fan talking to someone who doesn t like baseball or hasn t gone to a baseball game as what the church does for the nones.Daniel also goes into a type of history of how the nones have begun to emerge throughout all of history She mixes this history along with her own personal history This was a good section to bring her theory home.There were only a few critiques I had about the book, but they were not major At times I found Daniel got into preacher mode which isn t a bad thing, but it drew away from her point The other critique was this was super short We are talking about 130 pages ebook version I thought she could have expanded a bit longer on her 4 sub categories.I should also note that I am a liberal preacher I make note of this because she is pretty critical of the evangelical conservative church I wanted to warn my conservative readers about that one.I gave this one 4 stars I want to thank NetGalley and Faithwords for allowing me to read this advanced copy of the book I received it from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review


  3. says:

    Daniel was tired of feeling responsible to apologize for everything done by anyone who called themselves a Christian She shares her thoughts on the kind of spirituality she embraces and promotes She writes about inventing our own spirituality, Fundamentalists defining religion, listening to NONES and attracting them to church and convincing them of the value of faith and community She explains how exclusive salvation views turn people off She advocates paying attention to the entire Bible, n Daniel was tired of feeling responsible to apologize for everything done by anyone who called themselves a Christian She shares her thoughts on the kind of spirituality she embraces and promotes She writes about inventing our own spirituality, Fundamentalists defining religion, listening to NONES and attracting them to church and convincing them of the value of faith and community She explains how exclusive salvation views turn people off She advocates paying attention to the entire Bible, not just proof texts.Daniel describes herself as a liberal Christian and an open minded one Evangelical Christians may have difficulty with Daniel identifying herself as a Christian She says being born again and saved hasn t happened to her 135 She participated in the movement for gay marriage She writes, I believe you can be an open minded Christian, who thinks God can work out everyone s salvation 16 I believe there are many paths to God 14 Daniel emphasizes how we live, not what we believe I m a pastor, she writes, and I don t care what you believe I don t think God does either 121 She draws our attention to what Jesus said and did, not doctrine.While I don t agree with much Daniel writes, I do appreciate that she draws attention to Christendom and the negative effect it has had on the perception of Christianity by many I also appreciate her emphasis on what the church should really be doing, helping one another in community This book reminded me that Christianity is a broad spectrum It also reminded me that it is important I know what I believe and why I believe it.Those within theconservative Christian community might want to read this book to understand how the liberal Christian community thinks, worships, and ministers There might be a good discussion resulting as to what really defines a Christian and what communities of faith are to be doing.I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher for the purpose of an independent and honest review


  4. says:

    Lillian Daniel writes well For that reason this was an enjoyable book to read The content was lacking and the title was somewhat misleading There were a lot of good points in this book and she intrigued me to continue reading It was a very quick read, but very liberal in substance Hats off to the writer for evangelizing the faith.


  5. says:

    I work in a career field made up predominately of atheists and agnostics, among whom there are many who have been hurt by the church or else simply have no use for it Many times in conversation, I have found myself wanting to apologize or else needing to defend my own beliefs, which lead to hesitance in even bringing them up When I saw Lillian s book, I thought it would be something that offered encouragement to people in such a place, as well as insight on how to handle those situations But I work in a career field made up predominately of atheists and agnostics, among whom there are many who have been hurt by the church or else simply have no use for it Many times in conversation, I have found myself wanting to apologize or else needing to defend my own beliefs, which lead to hesitance in even bringing them up When I saw Lillian s book, I thought it would be something that offered encouragement to people in such a place, as well as insight on how to handle those situations But it turns out, Lillian and I don t belong to the same church either And while I appreciated her writing style and many of the points she brought up, I very much disagreed with her conclusions.In the second chapter, during a metaphor for the way Christians should handle questions about our faith, Lillian has this to say, Well, this path is no better than any other one, I reply And I feel good about I have neglected to apologize but have demonstrated how open minded I am But is that the point To let people know how open minded we are Or to express why we believe as we do I don t see how the author s response answered the question she started this analogy with which was why was she intent on the faith path she walked.However, in the tenth chapter, Lillian states, I am a pastor and I don t care what you believe I don t think God does either So maybe the author doesn t care to answer the question as much as she wants to convince people that religious community, any religious community, is what is important And to some extent, I agree Community is important, as is Lillian s assertion that no one should feel excluded over a point of disagreement But neither should we dismiss belief, because what we believe shapes how we behave.I will mention that I agreed with many of Lillian s critiques of the conservative church, however, in her critiques she also makes the implied assertion that conservatives cannot be open minded when she uses that term only to refer to people who agree with her on matters of belief or marriage, disregarding that there are even people in between who agree with some, but not all, of the things she does And, when describing the arguments conservatives make, particularly regarding those of creationism, she says, If I were Satan and I wanted to destroy every good thing in Christianity, that s the dichotomy I d set up It would ensure that all the smart people stayed away and all the idiots stayed in As I stated above, I do agree with many of Lillian s observations The church often does a poor job of listening to the people they wish to reach and many conservative Christians are harsh and judgemental But that does not mean that her philosophy on religion solves those issues nor that the very real criticisms of her work, from people of all walks of life, can be waved away as she does in this book.I have provided an honest review after receiving a copy of the book from the publisher


  6. says:

    This book is no master work Lillian Daniels, the bestselling author who wrote the Spiritual but Not Religious series of articles and book does, however, speak from a mostly down to earth and relatively rational perspective about Christian faiths It s really a book for anyone, with any set of beliefs or non beliefs, who seeks to better understand a faith that has been under recent fire from publicity of its fundamental, judgmental contingent The point Daniels argues is that, as with anything This book is no master work Lillian Daniels, the bestselling author who wrote the Spiritual but Not Religious series of articles and book does, however, speak from a mostly down to earth and relatively rational perspective about Christian faiths It s really a book for anyone, with any set of beliefs or non beliefs, who seeks to better understand a faith that has been under recent fire from publicity of its fundamental, judgmental contingent The point Daniels argues is that, as with anything, one cannot paint with a broad brush about all Christians just like one cannot paint with a broad brush about all Muslims, all Hindus, all Jews, or all Atheists and Agnostics People are as complex and variegated as they are populous, and saying carte A matches carte B and C because they re all cartes is both unfair and dangerous If we walk around like that, we miss the point of religion that of community and that of being part of a tradition much larger than oneself Empowerment is fine, but Daniels argues that we live in an increasingly narcissistic culture where one only argues on behalf of the self, not on behalf of others or on behalf of something, anything higher It s also not a club that we can kick people in and out of technically, if the words of Christ are to be followed, all are welcome, and all can come as they are It s a refreshing perspective on something that has seemed stagnant and unwelcoming, until perhaps the election of the relatively liberal Francis to the Papacy Do good to others Love one another Have some faith in something Search for your place and fight for it Don t feel the need to apologize for an extremist s choices in representing an entire culture These are the messages espoused in the book, which was a quick and enjoyable read


  7. says:

    Wow, what a great book I m so glad to have met Lillian Daniel, a new to me author This book really spoke to me, so much so that I have recorded some of my favorite ideas and quotes from the book I liked learning about SBNR Spiritual but not religious Stop boring me I learned about 4 types of nones 1 No way 2 No longer 3 Never have 4 Not yet Her analogies of the spiritual practices to sports or practicing medicine, and her analogy of finding a church is like finding a college to Wow, what a great book I m so glad to have met Lillian Daniel, a new to me author This book really spoke to me, so much so that I have recorded some of my favorite ideas and quotes from the book I liked learning about SBNR Spiritual but not religious Stop boring me I learned about 4 types of nones 1 No way 2 No longer 3 Never have 4 Not yet Her analogies of the spiritual practices to sports or practicing medicine, and her analogy of finding a church is like finding a college to go to Anyone can find God alone on a picturesque mountaintop The miracle is that we can find God in the company of other people as annoying as we are It is profoundly counter cultural to take an hour each week to worship someone other than oneself It s even weirder to do it with other people in community and over time, in a tradition older and larger than you are Stop agonizing over what you believe, as if that determines whether or not you can be in church Your beliefs are not that important You re not that important I m not that important Heaven has got to be a lotinteresting than a debate about doctrine If heaven is a place with a theological checklist, I don t want to go Religion at its best focuses on how to live, not what to think We may feed the hungry, visit the sick, and love our enemies, but non religious people can do all these things as poorly as religious people What sets us apart is our practice of worshipping God in the company of other people in a tradition larger and older than we are I will be highly recommending this book to my friends


  8. says:

    The basic idea of this book is that the Christian church in the broad sense has let the wrong people define it the televangelists, the Far Right, the witch burners, etc This unpleasant picture of Christianity has resulted in a public relations problem with a public which accepts this picture as the whole of religion In contrast with the image of a body of money grubbing, narrow minded, anti intellectual hypocrites, Lillian Daniel believes that the church has a lot to be proud of, and a lot to The basic idea of this book is that the Christian church in the broad sense has let the wrong people define it the televangelists, the Far Right, the witch burners, etc This unpleasant picture of Christianity has resulted in a public relations problem with a public which accepts this picture as the whole of religion In contrast with the image of a body of money grubbing, narrow minded, anti intellectual hypocrites, Lillian Daniel believes that the church has a lot to be proud of, and a lot to offer.I agree with her on most points, and I like her description and prescriptions for the Four Types of Nones I think religious leaders, in particular, could find valuable insights in Tired Of Apologizing For A Church I Don t Belong To Further, Daniel s writing is clear and sometimes laugh aloud funny.Unfortunately, while I m sure there is enough material behind her premise to fill a book even longer than the 195 pages offered here, the present volume feels like an article that has been stretched There are too many repetitions, some of which read like the result of slipshod editing There are also digressions and anecdotes that detract from, rather than support, Daniel s thesis.I liked a lot about this book, but think it falls one or two rewrites short of its potential


  9. says:

    Our Book Club just finished Daniel s book It follows her earlier book titled, Spiritual but not Religious Is Not Enough Seeing God in Surprising Places, Even the Church She serves a U.C.C congregation in Dubuque, Ia.She spoke to Brethren ministers last summer at a pre conference meeting I found it easy to read and understand In chapter 5 she lists Four Types of Nones 1 no ways 2 no longers 3 never haves and 4 not yets This is not an exhaustive list, but she attempts to describe Our Book Club just finished Daniel s book It follows her earlier book titled, Spiritual but not Religious Is Not Enough Seeing God in Surprising Places, Even the Church She serves a U.C.C congregation in Dubuque, Ia.She spoke to Brethren ministers last summer at a pre conference meeting I found it easy to read and understand In chapter 5 she lists Four Types of Nones 1 no ways 2 no longers 3 never haves and 4 not yets This is not an exhaustive list, but she attempts to describe the folks who have given up on the church The paperback version has a rather weak set of discussion questions in the back, but those are not available in the hardback copy We tried to use them, but they weren t very helpful.I laughed many times at the stories she tells, and was well worth our time reading It was a good book club book for lay people, but lacked the depth pastors and scholars would expect There were no footnotes or references, but since I agreed with her opinions I didn t really need them


  10. says:

    To be completely honest I am actually not too sure what I think of this book There were a lot of good points, especially the first few chapters dealing with the nones and the SBNRs Spiritual But Not Religious I appreciated Daniel s quick wit and humour as well as her questions concerning the church and what people may be forced into believing rather than claiming spirituality as their own On the other hand, it was a bit repetitive at times, focused almost solely on her own spirituali To be completely honest I am actually not too sure what I think of this book There were a lot of good points, especially the first few chapters dealing with the nones and the SBNRs Spiritual But Not Religious I appreciated Daniel s quick wit and humour as well as her questions concerning the church and what people may be forced into believing rather than claiming spirituality as their own On the other hand, it was a bit repetitive at times, focused almost solely on her own spirituality and experiences, and also quite definitely a liberal interpretation This book wasn t quite what I thought it would be when I picked it up and that was a bit disappointing, but I can t say I regret reading it I definitely think if nothing else, opening my mind to what people have stopped attending church is worth it alone I d say my rating hovers somewhere between 2.5 and 3.5 stars I m just not sure exactly where to land it

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