➵ Povestirile unui vânător Read ➼ Author Ivan Turgenev – Varanus.us

Povestirile unui vânătorPovestitorul Lui Turgheniev V Neaz Prea Pu In, Iar Atunci Cand Vaneaza, Iar Aten Ia I Se Ndreapt Mai Tot Timpul Spre Oameni I Pove Tile Lor Fie C Nnopteaz N Podul Unei Mori B Ntuite, C L Prinde Ploaia Ntr O P Dure Necunoscut , C P Ze Te Caii Al Turi De Copiii Guralivi Ai Unor Rani, El Folose Te Orice Prilej S Iscodeasc Pove Ti De Via , S Scoat La Iveal Nt Mpl Ri Cu Stafii Sau Personaje Incredibile, S Istoriseasc Via A I Aventurile Vreunei Fete Frumoase, Pe Care O Nt Lne Te Nt Mpl Tor

    10 thoughts on “➵ Povestirile unui vânător Read ➼ Author Ivan Turgenev – Varanus.us


  1. says:

    Ivan Turgenev is probably the least known of the Russian trio of Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy and Turgenev but nonetheless you should read him if you want to boast that you ve read the Russians.Sketches from a Hunter s Album is a lesser known work of this lesser known Russian, written before his big novel Fathers and Sons Oh, you think everyone s interesting That s because you re a Red I don t I believe that quite a lot of people were just manufactured when God was thinking of something else, say Ivan Turgenev is probably the least known of the Russian trio of Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy and Turgenev but nonetheless you should read him if you want to boast that you ve read the Russians.Sketches from a Hunter s Album is a lesser known work of this lesser known Russian, written before his big novel Fathers and Sons Oh, you think everyone s interesting That s because you re a Red I don t I believe that quite a lot of people were just manufactured when God was thinking of something else, says a character in Mortimer s Paradise Postponed and Turgenev must obviously be a Red because he finds all his subjects in those little sketches immensely interesting In just a few pages he extracts what is important about a character and make him as vivid as if we met the chap ourselves and drank vodka with him He does also write about women.Upon a first glance these are just beautiful pastoral stories filled with love for the Russian landscape and its people, but obviously they are not as innocent as they appear or Turgenev wouldn t get arrested on their account.Nowadays we might wonder what was so outrageous about them but in Tsarist Russia you simply couldn t say anything that would question the institution of serfdom which was thriving in Russia until mid 19th century, long after it was abandoned in Western Europe, and was almost indistinguishable from slavery.Turgenev doesn t come across as very engaged because his narrator is almost entirely removed, his only role being that of an observer, but with such an obvious injustice facts alone suffice and there is hardly any need for a commentary Also, his perceptive portraits of all the characters speak volumes about his compassion,than any politically engaged diatribe would.While the political angle of this book is important, it, of course, is no longer as relevant as it was What is important, though, are the descriptions of nature and landscape I read and re read those wanting to teleport myself to Ukraine in summer or spring Sadly, here I am, in dreary London, where there was no summer for the last three years When was the last time I spent a warm summer night by a campfire When was the last time I smelled the forest early in the morning When was the last time I ran through the fields escaping a sudden spring shower When did I actually wade in a river Turgenev is right non hunters can envy hunters I envy them the whole thing, bar the animal killing, as I don t have any need for that If you can go to some untamed countryside in a temperate climate, go If you can t, read Turgenev, it s the next best thing I don t think there is any writer who can evoke a sense of placegracefully than him He also addresses the reader directly although he does, of course, assume him to be a man , which is rather quaint and I wishcontemporary writers did that, other than in post modernist experiments a la Calvino I liked this book so much I also bought a Polish translation I think Turgenev would read wonderfully in Polish.All of the stories were beautifully written but as far as content goes, my favourite ones were Bezhin Lea and the Clatter of Wheels Interestingly, they both take place during a summer night Give me a summer night Or at least real spring I ll take springIt s time, however, to finish Appropriately I have mentioned the spring in springtime it is easy to say goodbye, in the spring even the happy are enticed to far off places Farewell, my reader I wish you lasting happiness and well being


  2. says:

    I managed to finish this book with enormous effort, it is complex, especially the Italian version, contains words by now dated and difficult to understand I read therefore with a huge fear, I was almost to give up the book because the effort was much bigger than the pleasure of reading and insteadAs I proceeded in the 24 stories, we meet the narrator in his wandering through the Russian countryside, where he meets characters of every social stratum the noble and the enriched peasant, the v I managed to finish this book with enormous effort, it is complex, especially the Italian version, contains words by now dated and difficult to understand I read therefore with a huge fear, I was almost to give up the book because the effort was much bigger than the pleasure of reading and insteadAs I proceeded in the 24 stories, we meet the narrator in his wandering through the Russian countryside, where he meets characters of every social stratum the noble and the enriched peasant, the vagabond, the servant and the penniless intellectual.It is the people that we will find most as the pivotal description in the book, their misery and their prejudices, but also their beauty, intelligence and values One can certainly call it an inquiry book , everything is reported and described without ever reaching an aggressive tone or clear invective to the regime perhaps for this reason, surprisingly, it was not censored by the Russian authorities.The narrator, who later we will discover to be called P tr Petrovi , stands aside, his descriptions remaining neutral, slowly lead to the emergence in a kind of hidden way but a very lucid and pitiless criticism of the implacable social system of the time.The most beautiful part is the description of nature, where the concept of hunting is gradually being left aside for landscape descriptions so intimate and beautiful to take your breath away Everything becomes concreteness, the smells of the wet earth after a thunderstorm all the senses are stimulated As if in the end the ultimate desire of Turgenev is to point the finger towards an infinite horizon, where is the beauty and the ultimate mystery of nature lead to determine the embrace of happiness for the man s heart.Wonderful is the description of the sky, an immensity that becomes sea The elements melt and merge into a universe of colors of sounds and emotions.Sono riuscita a finire questo libro con enorme fatica, complesso, soprattutto la versione italiana contiene parole ormai datate e di difficile comprensione Ho letto quindi con un ti enorme, stavo quasi lasciando il libro perch la fatica era ben superiore del piacere della lettura e inveceman mano che procedevo nei 24 racconti, mi si sono aperte davanti agli occhi tutte le scene descritte.Turgenev nel suo vagabondare per la campagna russa, porta in vita personaggi di ogni strato sociale l nobile e il contadino arricchito, il vagabondo, il servo e l intellettuale squattrinato.E il popolo che piu troveremo come descrizione cardine nel libro, la sua miseria e i suo pregiudizi ma anche la sua bellezza, intelligenza e i suoi valori Si pu certamente definirlo un libro inchiesta , tutto viene riportato ed descritto senza arrivare mai ad un tono aggressivo n si arriva mai alla chiara invettiva forse proprio per questo, sorprendentemente, non fu censurato dalle autorit russe.Il narratore, che poi scopriremo chiamarsi P tr Petrovi , si tiene in disparte, le sue descrizioni ur rimanendo neutre, portano pian piano a far emergere una critica lucidissima e impietosa sull implacabile sistema sociale dell epoca.La parte piu bella in assoluto la descrizione della natura, dove pian piano il concetto della caccia viene soppiantato per lasciar spazio a delle descrizioni cos belle da togliere il fiato Tutto diventa concretezza, gli odori della terra bagnata dopo un temporale tutti i sensi sono stimolati Come se alla fine il desiderio ultimo di Turgenev quello di puntare il dito verso un orizzonte infinito, dove il bello e il mistero ultimo della natura portano a determinare l abbraccio di felitica del cuore dell uomo Meravigliosa la descrizione del cielo, una immensit che diventa mare.gli elementi si sciolgono e si confondono in un universo fatto di colori di suoni e di emozioni


  3. says:

    Zapiski Ohotnika Sketches From a Hunter s Album A Sportsman s Sketches, Ivan Turgenev A Sportsman s Sketches is an 1852 collection of short stories by Ivan Turgenev It was the first major writing that gained him recognition The list of stories Khor and Kalinych Yermolay and the Miller s Wife Raspberry Water District Doctor My Neighbor Radilov Farmer Ovsyanikov Lgov Bezhin Lea Kasyan from the Beautiful Lands Bailiff The Office Loner Two Landowners Lebedyan Zapiski Ohotnika Sketches From a Hunter s Album A Sportsman s Sketches, Ivan Turgenev A Sportsman s Sketches is an 1852 collection of short stories by Ivan Turgenev It was the first major writing that gained him recognition The list of stories Khor and Kalinych Yermolay and the Miller s Wife Raspberry Water District Doctor My Neighbor Radilov Farmer Ovsyanikov Lgov Bezhin Lea Kasyan from the Beautiful Lands Bailiff The Office Loner Two Landowners Lebedyan Tatyana Borisovna and her Nephew Death Singers Pyotr Petrovich Karataev Meeting Hamlet of the Shchigrovsky District Chertopkhanov and Nedopyuskin The End of Chertopkhanov Living Relic The Clatter of Wheels Forest and Steppe 1984 1362 447 1369 19 1363 271 1396 282 9786008547143


  4. says:

    The Publisher Says Turgenev s first major prose work is a series of twenty five Sketches the observations and anecdotes of the author during his travels through Russia satisfying his passion for hunting His album is filled with moving insights into the lives of those he acquaints with, peasants and landowners, doctors and bailiffs, neglected wives and bereft mothers each providing a glimpse of love, tragedy, courage and loss, and anticipating Turgenev s great later works such as First Love an The Publisher Says Turgenev s first major prose work is a series of twenty five Sketches the observations and anecdotes of the author during his travels through Russia satisfying his passion for hunting His album is filled with moving insights into the lives of those he acquaints with, peasants and landowners, doctors and bailiffs, neglected wives and bereft mothers each providing a glimpse of love, tragedy, courage and loss, and anticipating Turgenev s great later works such as First Love and Fathers and Sons His depiction of the cruelty and arrogance of the ruling classes was considered subversive and led to his arrest and confinement to his estate, but these sketches opened the minds of contemporary readers to the plight of the peasantry and were even said to have led Tsar Alexander II to abolish serfdom.My Review This edition of A Sportsman s Sketches or Sketches from a Hunter s Album contains 13 of a possible 25 short fictions published by the tyro writer in Russia s preeminent literary magazine, The Contemporary, from 1847 to 1851 These were his first prose outpourings, designed to sustain his independent life far away from his autocratic and abusive mother He brought these luminous, beautiful vignettes to life in partial imitation of his beloved s husband s workLouis Viardot, much older husband of opera singer Pauline Viardot, and author of Souvenirs de chasse, a very similar collection of huntsman s memories of the countryside and people of Viardot s youthbut of his own youthful world at his mother s country estate.The stories all illustrate the young author s liberalism, his disdain for the serf system sustaining a luxurious lifestyle for some and penury and privation for most They were hailed by his fellow liberals, and entered the canon of Russian literature on the strength of that appeal But generations of readers will attest that what keeps people reading these vignettes is a certain deftness and facility with characters and descriptions that is so robust that it even survives translation These are objects of rare beauty Not much when considered as stories, they blossom into beauty when viewed as moments lived by a very acute observer.Singers is possibly my favorite of the sketches The bleakness of the village, the unexpectedness of the singing contest in such a place, and the sheer animal drive of humans to find SOME joy in lifememorable.Kasyan from the Beautiful Lands makes me weepthe dwarf, his simple belief that the world is good but mankind is not, his strength and certainty, all in contrast to our helpless and feckless narratorhow clear is Turgenev s picture of the unfairness of privilege unearned.Forest and Steppe is, alone, the best reason I can give to you to go and get this book and read it It shimmers Its beauty of image and of imagination is simply unsurpassable It is as close to perfect as any piece of writing I ve ever seen.So many of the others are, while good and worthy pieces of fiction, just not superb, that I feel it s best to saythe reason to read this collection is the cumulative effect of many a small, beautiful moment, not a Grand Revelation More like walking in the woods by yourself, noticing birdsong and small shy flowers, than stumbling all unaware across the Grand Canyon


  5. says:

    Reading this first work of Turgenev s I tried as far as possible to prolong my enjoyment, often laying the book down on my knees I rejoiced the naive customs and charming pictures of which I was given a delightful collection in each of the stories of this book Alphonse de LamartineTurgenev s portrayal of life of serfs has a distant compassion and admiration, which is some times even though very rarely and never blatantly elegiac This book was apparently a reaction to what he observed i Reading this first work of Turgenev s I tried as far as possible to prolong my enjoyment, often laying the book down on my knees I rejoiced the naive customs and charming pictures of which I was given a delightful collection in each of the stories of this book Alphonse de LamartineTurgenev s portrayal of life of serfs has a distant compassion and admiration, which is some times even though very rarely and never blatantly elegiac This book was apparently a reaction to what he observed in his country before fleeing abroad, his Hannibal s oath to never reconcile to the enemy serfdom Now reactionary writing can defile stories with outside motivation Not so the case here His energy is channelized in serving us subtle, overtly nonpartisan portraits He, a hunter a disguise for peeking into the country life , acquaints himself with hordes of characters, coming in their touch for renting places to spend nights at, for finding helpers and horses and hooch He is ever friendly with them yet never becomes too intimate What we read here thus is not psychologically astute observations or sermons on moral uprightness and simplicity, but anecdotes chance encounters, gossips, confessions that very naturally branch off from shop talks and hunting expeditions all that form in our mind slight, hazy pictures that, we can appreciate how, would challenge the ill conceived notions of those times about serfs A classic survives its age it remains alive not as annals of times passed, or as a conveyor of the human sensitivity then It survives because it offers that the value of which does not decay with time A Hunter s Sketches here offers what I would call stillness One may be completely oblivious to the political and social situation this book was written in, and yet one would find a gold mine of content for intellect and soul Very fittingly Turgenev lets a story be simple, seemingly plotless The prose poems move forward leisurely, the observations mundane, incidental, and just as the unchallenged reader begins to forge a character into a definite shape, he is surprised Take for example the story the collection opens with, Khor and Kalinych The unnamed narrator of the book presumably Turgenev himself travels with Kalinych to Khor s house and has a long conversation with him Khor emerges as a sensible and worldly man, who has his prejudices, against education, women etc all while Kalinych remains mute and lost a typical simpleton Turgenev does nothing to change our view, until the last para ThereIt will be a fine day tomorrow, I remarked looking at the clear sky No, it will rain, Kalinych replied, the ducks yonder are splashing, and the grass smells strongly We drove into the copse Kalinych began singing in an undertone as he jolted up and down on the driver s seat, and he kept gazing at the sunset The next day I left the house of Mr PolutykinNature is the second theme of this book Turgenev describes nature as a hunter would as beautiful and fulfilling the hunter s life to be lived in integrity with it A reader may want to skip through frequent descriptions however for Turgenev commits the debutant s folly of overdoing it Of course, you forgive the author in the end this is how he starts the last piece of this collection with a direct note to the reader after an excerpt from a poem on nature he consigned to flames The reader is, very likely, weary of my sketches I hasten to reassure him by promising to confine myself to fragments already printed but a parting cannot refrain from saying a few words about hunter s lifeAnd guess what In next few paras he describes the marvel in hunting with a gun and a dog through forests and steppes, in spring and autumn and summer and winter, night and day Sometimes he is so warm you get goosebumps However, it is time to end By the way, I have spoken of spring in spring it is easy to part, in spring even the happy feel the pull of the distance Farewell, reader I wish you constant well being This book will always remain on my bookshelf, to be dusted and frequented, to be smelled and kissed after a busy day at office you don t need wine and music, you need a Turgenev s story reclining on a settee


  6. says:

    Like a lot of my five star books, this one has significance to me that extends beyond the words on the page Years ago I got to talking about books with a really beautiful bartender at the old San Francisco Brewing Company I said how I hadn t read much of the Russians echoing something Ezra Pound says in Hemingway s A Moveable Feast I think Pound actually says Rooskies The woman put her hands over her heart and looked to heaven Oh Turgenev she said Turgenev Obviously that tugged my Like a lot of my five star books, this one has significance to me that extends beyond the words on the page Years ago I got to talking about books with a really beautiful bartender at the old San Francisco Brewing Company I said how I hadn t read much of the Russians echoing something Ezra Pound says in Hemingway s A Moveable Feast I think Pound actually says Rooskies The woman put her hands over her heart and looked to heaven Oh Turgenev she said Turgenev Obviously that tugged my interest.A few years later I was browsing in a bookstore in Kathmandu which is a very good book town, in case you didn t know and found a little volume of A Hunter s Sketches It was a very interesting edition published in Moscow, but in English The binding, boards and end papers were all of very high quality There was even a little red ribbon book mark sewn in Of course I bought it.The book followed me up the Solo Khumbu valley, all the way to the top of Imja Tse, to 21,000 feet It tagged along afterward to the Thai hill country, to Northern Australia, and stayed in my panniers on a bike trip around the Coromandel Peninsula in New Zealand I dipped into the book nearly every night during that whole year long adventure Turgenev s stories are deep in character and setting You can smell the spring wheat being harvested, feel the rough boards of a peasant s table under your fingers I ve never been to Russia, but on that long trip the Hunter s Sketches felt like a little bit of home, somewhere warm and inviting I could return to every night


  7. says:

    I bought this for the cover art I love everything about Jevgraf Fiodorovitch Krendovsky s 1836 painting Preparations for Hunting in the Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow The calm, subdued, but rich color palette, the glances the young hunters, and the young boy on the left, are giving each other, the angles of arms and legs, the devoted hunting dog with its paw on its master s leg, the attention to details of fashion and outerwear It many ways it s a perfect choice for cover art for the book so mu I bought this for the cover art I love everything about Jevgraf Fiodorovitch Krendovsky s 1836 painting Preparations for Hunting in the Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow The calm, subdued, but rich color palette, the glances the young hunters, and the young boy on the left, are giving each other, the angles of arms and legs, the devoted hunting dog with its paw on its master s leg, the attention to details of fashion and outerwear It many ways it s a perfect choice for cover art for the book so much cover art is incomprehensibly ill matched These sketches by Turgenev almost all begin with a hunter setting out on a hunt, with a hunting companion or alone, on his horse or in some kind of cart or carriage, with his hunting dog And the hunting going on here is an upper class pursuit We can tell from the painting that that s an upper class residence, upper class young men When the lower classes hunt, it s usually called poaching, because hunting involves land, and landowners, and private property So when Turgenev s first person narrator goes out hunting in one sketch, and the landowner confronts him and asks him what he s doing, the situation quickly resolves because they re two aristocrats and the aristocratic privilege to hunt is extended from one landowner to another.As Richard Freeborn s excellent introduction explains, hunting is the pretext for these sketches What they re really about, which the Russian government understood because it exiled Turgenev to his estate after the Sketches were published, is the terrible conditions of serfdom and servitude in Russia Every sketch contains some poor wretch who is cold, hungry, or orphaned, or whose master won t allow him or her to get married, or won t sell her to a man who wants to marry her , or some serf being administered a beating by the landowner s bailiff, or some woman being beaten by some man, and most of them contain unhappy dogs who are never fed or burrow into the ground from cold and hunger.In spite of the subject matter, Turgenev maintains a certain calm distance from it I wouldn t say there s a consistent tone of irony throughout, but occasionally irony is put to brilliant use, as in this passage from the first sketch, Khor and Kalinych While out hunting in the Zhizdra region I became acquainted with a small Kaluga landowner, Polutykin, also a passionate hunter and, consequently, an excellent fellow Admittedly, he had acquired one or two weaknesses for instance, he paid court to all the rich young ladies of marriageable age in the province and, being refused both their hands and admission to their homes, confessed his grief heartbrokenly to all his friends and acquaintances while continuing to send the young ladies parents gifts of sour peaches and other raw produce from his garden he was fond of repeating one and the same anecdote which, despite Polutykin s high opinion of its merits, simply failed to make anyone laugh he was full of praise for the works of Akim Nakhimov and the story Pinna he had a stammer he called his dog Astronomer instead of however he used to say howsoever, and he introduced in his own house a French cuisine, the secret of which, according to his cook s ideas, consisted in completely altering the natural taste of each dish in the hands of this culinary master meat turned out to be fish, fish became mushrooms, and macaroni ended up dry as powder over, no carrot would be permitted in a soup that had not first assumed a rhomboidal or trapezoidal shape But apart from these minor and insignificant failings Polutykin was, as I ve said, an excellent fellow.There is fantastic anthropomorphizing, especially of dogs Astronomer, referred to above, is accompanying the narrator and some peasants on a cart ride Let Astronomer be seated exclaimed Polutykin pompously.Fedya, not without a show of pleasure, lifted the uneasily smiling dog into the air and deposited it on the floor of the cart.In another sketch a landowner is attempting to teach his poodle the ABCs, which the dog unhappily refuses to learn He gave the dog a shove with his foot The wretched dog rose up calmly, let the bread drop off its nose and walked away, deeply offended, into the hallway literally on tip toe And with good reason here was a stranger come to visit for the first time and look how they treated him Turgenev s other strengths on display here are his wonderful powers of description, both of physical environments and people No character is introduced without a complete rundown of his appearance, including hair, face, figure, and clothes The novel s realism makes it a valuable historical document


  8. says:

    It s strange how things happen in life you live with someone for a long time, you are on the best of terms, yet you never once speak to them frankly and from the heart with someone else, you ve hardly even got acquainted and there you are as if at confession, one or other of you is blurting out all his most intimate secrets. 41 A Sportman s Notebook comprises 25 stories that center on the sportman s that is, the hunter s life The stories freely and poignantly portray the hardships of li It s strange how things happen in life you live with someone for a long time, you are on the best of terms, yet you never once speak to them frankly and from the heart with someone else, you ve hardly even got acquainted and there you are as if at confession, one or other of you is blurting out all his most intimate secrets. 41 A Sportman s Notebook comprises 25 stories that center on the sportman s that is, the hunter s life The stories freely and poignantly portray the hardships of life in rural Russia at the time in particular the plight of the peasants, who suffered much in the forms of abject poverty and abuse by their masters It is said that Turgenev s stories contributed to Tsar Alexander II s decision to liberate the serfs The stories extend beyond mere socio political criticism, however Turgenev, as is his wont, describes the countryside and its inhabitants with great feeling and vividness Henry James, contemporary and friend of Turgenev, complained of the atmosphere of unrelieved sadness in the latter s writing and, surely, you are left every now and then with a feeling of having been kicked in the gut Of all other writers that I know, Hemingway comes closest to emulating this effect and he, of course, was a great admirer of Turgenev, calling him the greatest writer ever, and citing A Sportman s Notebook as an example for his own short stories There is muchto be said, but I m feeling ill, so I ll cut the review short, at least for now perhaps I ll add to it later It is a sorry fate not to know in the morning how you are going to fill your belly before the day is done. 33 It was, is, and always will be Of all the Russians, Turgenev, I think, was the most compassionate


  9. says:

    In his Preface to The Seasons the Scottish poet James Thomson wrote, I know no subjectelevating,amazing,ready to poetical enthusiasm, the philosophical reflection, and the moral sentiment than the works of nature Where can we meet such variety, such beauty, such magnificence This is a theme that runs through the Sketches From a Hunter s Album The beauty of the sylvan glade or the summer sun glistening off the meadows flowers is brought to life by the prose of Turgenev in In his Preface to The Seasons the Scottish poet James Thomson wrote, I know no subjectelevating,amazing,ready to poetical enthusiasm, the philosophical reflection, and the moral sentiment than the works of nature Where can we meet such variety, such beauty, such magnificence This is a theme that runs through the Sketches From a Hunter s Album The beauty of the sylvan glade or the summer sun glistening off the meadows flowers is brought to life by the prose of Turgenev in these vignettes Certainly the characters are also finely drawn and include all social stratas while emphasizing the narrator s interactions with peasants and serfs It is the latter that impress the reader by the respect and generosity with which they are treated The combination of fascinating characters and beautiful nature writing made this book a joy to read I found myself looking forward to the next chapter with expectation that I would be treated to another eveninteresting facet of the countryside and its denizens I was not disappointed until the end of the book and only then because I did not want it to end.Considering this book was first published in 1852 after having appeared serially as separate sketches, it is a further wonder because the serfs would not be freed for another decade These short stories revealed Turgenev s unique talent for story telling And they greatly influenced Russian short story writers into the early 20th century, including Anton Chekhov, Ivan Bunin, Alexander Kuprin and others The stories remain fresh today, even in translation, and reward the reader with their magnificence But let me leave you with a quote from Turgenev himself that expresses my feelings as well the deep, pure blue stirs on one s lips a smile, innocent as itself like the clouds over the sky, and, as it were, with them, happy memories pass in slow procession over the soul


  10. says:

    One of the finest books I ve ever read It sits on the top shelf with those few select novels that really changed my life Historically, the book was instrumental in swaying public opinion, particularly among the aristocracy, towards emancipating the serfs.The stories are really the account of a cultural anthropologist disguised as a sportsman He isn t really terribly interested in hunting no, his true fascination is with the peasants that accompany him and that he encounters along the way One of the finest books I ve ever read It sits on the top shelf with those few select novels that really changed my life Historically, the book was instrumental in swaying public opinion, particularly among the aristocracy, towards emancipating the serfs.The stories are really the account of a cultural anthropologist disguised as a sportsman He isn t really terribly interested in hunting no, his true fascination is with the peasants that accompany him and that he encounters along the way While he views them very much through the lens of a country gentleman, his insights, empathy, and resonance of the human condition penetrates class and makes for some extraordinary moments.Highly recommend I d also read this before Fathers and Sons for context

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