Everest 1953: The First Ascent to the Roof of the World

Everest 1953: The First Ascent to the Roof of the World[PDF] ✎ Everest 1953: The First Ascent to the Roof of the World By Mick Conefrey – Varanus.us On the morning of June , the day of Queen Elizabeth s coronation, the first news broke that Everest had finally been conquered Drawing on first hand interviews and unprecedented access to archives, t On the morning ofJune , the The First eBook ↠ day of Queen Elizabeth s coronation, the first news broke that Everest had finally been conquered Drawing on first hand interviews and unprecedented access to archives, this is a ground breaking new account of that extraordinary first ascent Revealing that what has gone down in history as a supremely well planned expedition was actually beset by crisis and controversy, Everestrecounts a bygone age of self sacrifice and heroism, using letters and personal Everest 1953: ePUB ¹ diaries to reveal the immense stress and heartache the climbers often hid from their fellow team members Charting how the ascent affected the original team in subsequent years and detailing its immense cultural impact today, Everestis the perfect book to commemorate this remarkable feat of the human will.

Everest 1953: The First Ascent to the Roof of the World
  • Hardcover
  • 336 pages
  • Everest 1953: The First Ascent to the Roof of the World
  • Mick Conefrey
  • English
  • 01 April 2017
  • 185168946X

    10 thoughts on “Everest 1953: The First Ascent to the Roof of the World


  1. says:

    I wanted to read this book because I had read Wade Davis epic Into The Silence earlier this year and wanted to understand why it had taken almost 50 years from Mallory and Irvine s near miss or possibly not to Hillary and Tenzing s triumph in 1953 That question is answered in the first couple of chapters and what follows is a very clear and well organised account of the 1953 expedition and its immediate precursors The author manages the difficult task of building tension as move towards a I wanted to read this book because I had read Wade Davis epic Into The Silence earlier this year and wanted to understand why it had taken almost 50 years from Mallory and Irvine s near miss or possibly not to Hillary and Tenzing s triumph in 1953 That question is answered in the first couple of chapters and what follows is a very clear and well organised account of the 1953 expedition and its immediate precursors The author manages the difficult task of building tension as move towards a climax of which we are already well aware.I enjoyed this book enormously it is a book for general readers rather than climbing enthusiasts although they will enjoy it too Unlike Into The Silence it, thankfully does not spend too long on the journey to the mountains What struck me most was that very little had changed between the twenties and the fifties the organisations at home in Britain seemed as stuffy as ever the technology, particularly in relation to oxygen was almost unchained and the enthusiastic amateurism was still the rule, rather than the exception.Highly recommended


  2. says:

    An excellent book including archive material which only came to light many years later The chapters on the summit assaults are thrilling, but the whole thing including the 1951 and 1952 preparatory expeditions, the change of leadership and all the aftermath are also very interesting.


  3. says:

    Its nice shows the different factors that revolved the everest in earlier and later years in regards to the all famous 1953 expedition It s cool to know all the characters and getting intimate with the surrounding details Though I found the writer a bit annoying at times with his comments, I find that this book is a nice read.


  4. says:

    This book was on the new book shelf at the library and looked interesting I have no desire to climb Mount Everest or to go snow camping ice climbing..however this is still a good read I was most interested in the social dynamics of the groups and attempts at summiting, and the ways in which the leader made decisions and the results of those actions There is a bit of this included in the book a few pages , and the key insight I personally am taking away is that sometimes a leader has to be mo This book was on the new book shelf at the library and looked interesting I have no desire to climb Mount Everest or to go snow camping ice climbing..however this is still a good read I was most interested in the social dynamics of the groups and attempts at summiting, and the ways in which the leader made decisions and the results of those actions There is a bit of this included in the book a few pages , and the key insight I personally am taking away is that sometimes a leader has to beof a dictator in certain situations, and it isn t always in the groups best interest to allow everyone to have a say voice their thoughts and sometimes this isn t obvious to anyone until after the factwhich just goes to show you how difficult leadership can be Also, sometimes a leader must turn back for the good of the team ultimate goal, regardless of any personal goals or ambitions they may have which may lead to personal disappointment but achievement for the team as a whole.Other interesting facts the real name of Mount Everest is actually Chomolungma, the local name for the mountain It was renamed after George Everest, a former chief surveyor Also, the Alpine Club was founded in 1857


  5. says:

    I ve read a large number of books about mountaineering over the years, and, needless to say, a number of them were about Everest The story of the ascent of Everest in 1953 by Ed Hillary and Tenzing Norgay, supported by a large British and Sherpa team, is well known and has always seemed pretty pat for God and country, rah rah For this book Conefrey did a huge amount of research, found old government papers and expedition diaries, and interviewed people who had been on or associated with the e I ve read a large number of books about mountaineering over the years, and, needless to say, a number of them were about Everest The story of the ascent of Everest in 1953 by Ed Hillary and Tenzing Norgay, supported by a large British and Sherpa team, is well known and has always seemed pretty pat for God and country, rah rah For this book Conefrey did a huge amount of research, found old government papers and expedition diaries, and interviewed people who had been on or associated with the expedition This work touches on so many of the things that were percolating underneath this story colonialism and the decreased influence of England around the world, racism, heroism, nationalism, politics, personal goals and limitations, andI didn t think there was muchfor me to learn about the first successful climb of Everest, but I was wrong This is a great addition to the literature Plus, it led me to the video on YouTube that was made in 1953 about the ascent So very interesting to watch


  6. says:

    Wow There are no words to describe this breathtaking inspirational account of the first team to summit Everest But, Mick Conefrey has not only portrayed the spirit of conquest, but has written an in depth account of the extensive planning that went into such an expedition The leadership and organization of Colonel John Hunt, the sacking of Eric Shipton, the media circus all serve as a backdrop to the final conquest on the slopes of Earth s highest mountain Hillary and Tenzing, and all who m Wow There are no words to describe this breathtaking inspirational account of the first team to summit Everest But, Mick Conefrey has not only portrayed the spirit of conquest, but has written an in depth account of the extensive planning that went into such an expedition The leadership and organization of Colonel John Hunt, the sacking of Eric Shipton, the media circus all serve as a backdrop to the final conquest on the slopes of Earth s highest mountain Hillary and Tenzing, and all who made their feat possible are detailed by extensive source documents, diaries, and autobiographies of this remarkable moment Of course, it leaves me anxious to get a copy of some of the autobiographies myself such as The Ascent of Everest by John HuntMountain Conquest by Eric ShiptonThe Wildest Dream Mallory His Conflicting Life and Passions by Peter GillmanAnd, three books by Sir Edmund Hillary High AdventureHigh in the Thin Cold AirFrom the Ocean to the Sky


  7. says:

    This is a well researched and comprehensive account of the planning and execution of the successful assault on Everest in 1952 It is an interesting and frank insight into the politics of the Everest Committee not everyone emerges creditably The contentious choice of a leader is well documented the mechanics of the climb are explained in moderate and sufficient detail and the book concludes with an analysis of the aftermath The latter is easy to forget, but as set out by the author the month This is a well researched and comprehensive account of the planning and execution of the successful assault on Everest in 1952 It is an interesting and frank insight into the politics of the Everest Committee not everyone emerges creditably The contentious choice of a leader is well documented the mechanics of the climb are explained in moderate and sufficient detail and the book concludes with an analysis of the aftermath The latter is easy to forget, but as set out by the author the months following the expedition were dogged by an extraordinary controversy as to who actually stood first on the summit Although in 1952 the climb was hailed as a great success, its impact on some of those concerned, especially the Sherpa Tenzing, is sad to read An enlightening and informative read


  8. says:

    Amazingly, this is the first book since 1953 about the successful 1953 Everest expedition British led, it put two distinctly different men a beekeeper from New Zealand and a former yak herder, born in Tibet and raised in Nepal at the summit of the world s highest mountain.But this is about muchthan climbing Weaving together themes of empire and post colonialism, hopes fulfilled and dreams dashed, personal and political misunderstandings and, most importantly, the sometimes extraordin Amazingly, this is the first book since 1953 about the successful 1953 Everest expedition British led, it put two distinctly different men a beekeeper from New Zealand and a former yak herder, born in Tibet and raised in Nepal at the summit of the world s highest mountain.But this is about muchthan climbing Weaving together themes of empire and post colonialism, hopes fulfilled and dreams dashed, personal and political misunderstandings and, most importantly, the sometimes extraordinary power of the human spirit, Everest 1953 is both a thrilling and thought provoking read


  9. says:

    Not my typical novel read but have an interest in ice cold, mountains and mountaineering Listened to on audible have a feeling might have actually struggled to read the physical novel Did find it slightly boring and had to eventually listen to on double speed Despite that I would still attempt to read or listen to other accounts along the same lines.


  10. says:

    A wonderful read but with a few continuity errors in the section dealing with the South Col I still really enjoyed it though Would have been a 4 but I d give it a 3.5.

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