✍ The Players of Ā Author A.E. van Vogt – Varanus.us

The Players of ĀGilbert Gosseyn, The Null A Genius Of The Earth Venus War, Never Realized That This Interplanetary War Was But A Borrowed Incident In A Greater Conflict Until He Was Thrust Onto The Galactic Battlefield As A Mere Pawn But In Picking Gosseyn As Expendable, Those Cosmic Opponents Unleashed Forces They Had Never Dreamed Existed One Was The Entrance Of A Powerful Third Party In The War The Second Was The Ability Of Certain Other Pawns To Foresee The Future Finally, There Was The Secret Of Gosseyn S Original Purpose A Secret Which Could Decide The Fate Of The Entire Galaxy

    10 thoughts on “ ✍ The Players of Ā Author A.E. van Vogt – Varanus.us


  1. says:

    Algunos tics de la New Wave antes de la New Wave u otra clase de trastorno con base humor stica G nero Ciencia Ficci n.Lo que nos cuenta Gilbert Gosseyn trata de oponerse al dictador gal ctico que busca a adir la Tierra a sus dominios mientras intenta conocer m s sobre sus propios or genes y los de sus capacidades especiales Publicado previamente por entregas a finales de los a o...


  2. says:

    magnum opus , , , , , , , , , , .


  3. says:

    41 snall88 that that180 glaxy, possesses processes I ll point out one hypocrisy there s texts about how one should not identify things, ie, speaking out against tribalism Meanwhile Gosseyn would never have a sexual relationship with a non null A


  4. says:

    Storyline 3 5Characters 1 5Writing Style 2 5World 2 5Vogt s Null series just cannot get all the positive components in place at the same time The first in the series, The World of Null A, had some really creative ideas and a fascinating world It suffered, in contrast, from awful writing and incoherent development In this sequel, The Players of Null A, the writing has improved by orders of magnitude and the developments and plot largely and in comparison with the...


  5. says:

    Second in a series Dammit I did it again At least it wasn t 19th in a series, like last time.It doesn t suffer as much as A Life for Kriegen did, partly because it is only the 2nd in a series, and partly because, being put together in 1948, the expectation was that new readers might pop in the middle of the story It s also fairly self contained.Nonetheless, if you read it, start with 1 There are a couple of pivotal points which assuredly have weight if you ve read the books in order There s an order Steven Univese Null A is essentially a fantasy story about the application of General Semantics that suggests that the human nervous system is capable of using its ability to identify actual reality as opposed to its symbolic representations to alter said reality This takes the form of the hero, Gilbert Gosseyn, being able to teleport short distances if he s thoroughly memorized the location he wants to teleport to and subject to the limitation of time, such that his memory doesn t match the location to 20 digits of preci...


  6. says:

    Excellent continuation of the golden age sci fi pulp classic The World of Null A in what is barely van Vogt s longest published novel I found this generally better developed and consistent, with fewer holes than the previous book.The story follows our protagonist, Gilbert Gosseyn, with his Null A abilities, including an extra brain and the ability to teleport himself, as he attempts to thwart the takeover of the galaxy by a malign despot, both through direct opposition and much behind the scenes subterfuge We get a much better description of the source of these Null A abilities, which boil down to a sort of self mind control and logical thinking patterns, obtained through specialized training, as opposed to the purely emotional based responses innate to humans All the while Gosseyn seeks to discover the galactic chess pla...


  7. says:

    Gosseyn spends most of the book in a tricky stalemate with his adversary, the mysterious Follower, and it is an uncharacteristically sluggish story where the interesting events millions of spaceships destroying hundreds or thousands of planets seem to take place offstage Gosseyn spends the book as the pawn in a game whose rules he doesn t understand, tossed around by players who hide their identities The reader only sees the long game at the end.The big reveal itself who is the Player, and who is the Follower is interesting, as is the background information about galactic civilization and development, but this comes only in time for the big showdown and conclusion It isn t the game changing news that it wants to be.You can see van Vogt s philosophical influences laced throughout the story The Null A techniques that he so lovingly details, of a person whose mental states are so p...


  8. says:

    I didn t like it as much as the first book which I had rated 3 stars I almost gave it up a couple of times The general semantics stuff was way to intrusive and didn t seem to carry over into the protagonist s actions that ...


  9. says:

    I had trouble starting this I dunno why I like van Vogt a lot, I really enjoyed the first bookyet I just had to force myself to pick this up I m glad I did, I couldn t put it down I think I enjoyed this book than the first The first book was interesting but I didn t feel like I related to the characters and the plot was jumpy and confusing This book had a easily comprehensible story line and I liked the characters a little Gosseyn was likeable, I felt In the last book, he just did stuff and let him self be maneuvered around This time around, he seemed to try to take control of the situations he is thrust into, instead of just being agreeable The same goes for the plot really, and I guess it circles back to Gosseyn taking of an active roll From the body jumping to his extra brain, the story felt evenly paced and easier to follow I really enjoyed the way this book felt like a mystery Who IS th...


  10. says:

    These books have a lot of issues, but in the end I find them very enjoyable A.E van Vogt has a very strange, almost arrogant style, but aside from that, and understanding that these books are a product of the times and an interesting look at early scifi, its forgivable I...

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